Current Events and the Psychology of Politics
Loading

Featured Posts        



categories        



Links        



archives        



meta        




Apr 18th, 2018




Tim Pawlenty Makes It Official: He’s Running for Governor Again


“My top priority will be putting those in the middle — who are working hard and getting squeezed — first. It’s a better way forward. I have the strength and experience to solve problems and bring us together.” (02:14)

By J. Patrick Coolican

April 6, 2018

Excerpts

Former Gov. Tim Pawlenty announced he is running for governor Thursday, attempting a restoration after eight years out of office that saw his DFL successor move the state in a more progressive direction at odds with Pawlenty’s tenure.

Pawlenty, a longtime Eagan resident, served two four-year terms beginning in 2003. The South St. Paul native built an image of a hockey-playing “Sam’s Club Republican” who could win suburban, middle-class voters in a Democratic-leaning state.

“My campaign for governor will focus on charting a better way forward for Minnesota families who see health care premiums skyrocketing, paychecks not increasing very fast, college costs and student debt rising — all while government spending and taxes climb through the roof,” Pawlenty said in a two-minute video released Thursday.

A comeback won’t be easy. Pawlenty’s long public record and most recent job as a bank lobbyist will give his opponents ammunition. And he must win over a Republican Party now led by President Donald Trump, who is fervently supported by the GOP base but was trashed by Pawlenty before the 2016 election as “unsound, uninformed, unhinged and unfit” for office.

Still, Pawlenty’s entry shakes up the open governor’s race, scrambling a GOP field thus far marked by a lack of enthusiasm among activists and financial donors. Gov. Mark Dayton is not running after his two terms, and the DFL field to replace him is unsettled. …

Pawlenty, 57, has not yet said if he will run for the GOP endorsement at the party’s convention in early June. He was scheduled to make his first public appearance as a candidate Friday morning at an Eagan diner.

Pawlenty has not been on a Minnesota ballot since 2006; his last political campaign was his bid for the 2012 Republican presidential nomination, but he withdrew in 2011 after finishing behind Michele Bachmann in an Iowa straw poll. Since then, he served as CEO of the Financial Services Roundtable in Washington, a lucrative lobbying job that he left last month.

Until now, the GOP front-runner in the governor’s race has been Hennepin County Commissioner Jeff Johnson, who lost the governor’s race to Dayton in 2014. Johnson easily won a caucus straw poll in February, but has struggled to raise money.

“Tim Pawlenty has never gotten over 46 percent of the vote in a statewide election, even after four years of being governor, and that was before a controversial second term, before he made $10 million as a Washington, D.C., lobbyist, and he publicly trashed Donald Trump a month before Election Day,” Johnson said this week. “He’s the last person Republicans should want at the top of the ticket in 2018.”

Pawlenty promises the ability to raise substantial money quickly from an enthusiastic business class, giving Republicans hope that their last candidate to win statewide can give them back the governor’s office in what is viewed as one of the most consequential elections in years. A Republican victory in November could mean full GOP control of state government for the first time in half a century.

Both political parties want to control government following the 2020 census, after which the Legislature and governor will negotiate the new legislative and congressional district lines that will drive Minnesota politics for the following decade.

The two parties will attempt to endorse a candidate for governor at conventions the first weekend of June, but officially pick their candidates in the August 14 primary election. …

Full report


Pawlenty_2018-campaign-logo
I am officially running for governor of Minnesota. … While the DFL remains divided, this is our time to prove we’re united in our goals to fix our broken health care system, add better paying jobs, hold government accountable and make Minnesota the number one state in the nation. … My campaign for Governor will focus on charting a better way forward for Minnesota families who see health care premiums skyrocketing, paychecks not increasing very fast, college costs and student debt rising — all while government spending and taxes climb through the roof. Minnesota deserves better — and we need to hold government more accountable!

Tim Pawlenty
Tim Pawlenty


Tim Pawlenty’s Psychological Profile

A psychological analysis of former Minnesota governor Tim Pawlenty — a contender for the Republican nomination in the 2012 U.S. presidential election — conducted 2010-2011 by Matt Draxler, Kelsea Schneider, Jeremiah Martin, Katherine Boehm,  Evan Johnson, Michelle Mueller, and Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, revealed that Pawlenty’s primary personality patterns are Conscientious/dutiful and Accommodating/ agreeable, with secondary Ambitious/confident and Outgoing/congenial features. In summary, Pawlenty’s personality composite can be characterized as a conscientious conciliator.

Pawlenty poster (edited 2018)
Click image for larger view

Personal Electability Index (PEI) = 9

Scale:   1A  1B   2   3   4   5A  5B   6   7   8   9   0
Score:    5    3    6   6  10    2    1   12  0   0   4   4

PEI: [Extraversion (scale 3) = 6] + [Narcissism (scale 2) = 6] + [Dominance (scale 1A) = 5] – [Introversion (scale 8) = 0] – [Conscientiousness (scale 6) = (12 - 4)] = 9


Related reports on this site


Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Rep. Michele Bachmann, and former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty during the Iowa GOP/Fox News Debate on August 11, 2011 in Ames, Iowa. (Photo credit: Pool / Getty Images)

Bachmann, Pawlenty ‘Slugfest’ At Iowa GOP Debate (Aug. 11, 2011)

Bachmann, Pawlenty Pour It On in War of Words (July 28, 2011)

Tim Pawlenty’s Personality Profile Respectful, Submissive (June 16, 2011)

Bachmann-Pawlenty ‘Minnesota Twins’ Grudge Match (June 7, 2011)

Dems Link Tim Pawlenty, Michele Bachmann (Sept. 20, 2009)

Pawlenty Compared to Bachmann (Sept. 10, 2009)

Faces of GOP Schism Starting to Take Shape (Nov. 19, 2008)


Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty and Indiana Rep. Mike Pence



South Korea’s national security adviser, Chung Eui-yong, announced at the White House that U.S. President Donald Trump will meet with North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un by May 2018. Kim reportedly said he is “committed to denuclearization” and pledged North Korea will “refrain from any further nuclear or missile tests.”

——————————————

Update: March 28, 2018

North Korea’s Kim Jong Un Met Xi Jinping on Surprise Visit to China

By Steven Jiang and Joshua Berlinger

March 28, 2018

Excerpts

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un met with the Chinese president on a surprise trip to Beijing this week, his first visit abroad since he took power in 2011.

Kim traveled to the Chinese capital because he felt compelled to personally inform President Xi Jinping of the rapid diplomatic developments on the Korean Peninsula in recent weeks, according to China’s state-run Xinhua news agency.

The visit is a stunning shift for Kim, who appears to be fashioning himself as a leader in search of a peaceful solution to the crisis on the Korean Peninsula. It’s in sharp contrast to 2017, when Kim oversaw a string of missile and nuclear tests that drew the ire of the international community.

Kim’s trip, which was shrouded in secrecy, was the first of three potential meetings with some of the world’s most powerful leaders.

Kim is set to attend a summit with South Korean President Moon Jae-in next month, and, in a bombshell move, US President Donald Trump has also accepted an invitation to meet Kim. It would be the first face-to-face encounter between a sitting US president and a North Korean head of state. …

Kim called for a “new era” in bilateral relations in a letter to Xi published on North Korean state media and invited the Chinese President to visit Pyongyang.

“In this spring full of happiness and hopes, I believe my first meeting with General Secretary Xi Jinping will yield abundant fruits of DPRK-China friendship, and facilitate peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula,” said Kim, referring to Xi by his title as leader of the Chinese Communist Party. …

North Korea’s diplomatic charm offensive is likely part of an attempt to show Kim as a world player equal in stature to leaders like Xi, said Jean Lee, an analyst at the Hyundai Motor-Korea Foundation Center for Korean History and Public Policy at The Wilson Center.

“We’re seeing a carefully crafted North Korean strategy on diplomacy unfold on the world stage, starting with Beijing,” Lee said.

“He’s positioned himself as the peacemaker, he’s made all the first moves.”

Kim told his hosts that he chose China as his first overseas destination as leader to show “his will to carry forward the tradition of DPRK-China friendship, and how he valued the friendship between the two countries.”

Chinese state media quoted Kim as saying that he is committed to the denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula, a key Chinese goal, but Lee warned Kim would seek major concessions in exchange for giving up nuclear weapons.

“The issue of denuclearization of the Korean Peninsula can be resolved, if South Korea and the United States respond to our efforts with goodwill, create an atmosphere of peace and stability while taking progressive and synchronous measures for the realization of peace,” Kim said, according to Xinhua. …

Full report

——————————————

Update: March 29, 2018

North and South Korean Leaders to Meet for Historic Summit on April 27

South Korean soldiers stand as vehicles carrying a South Korean delegation pass the Unification Bridge, which leads to Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, South Korea, Thursday, March 29.
South Korean soldiers stand as vehicles carrying a South Korean delegation pass the Unification Bridge, which leads to Panmunjom in the Demilitarized Zone, South Korea, Thursday, March 29, 2018. (Photo: Lee Jin-Man / AP via CNN)

By Ben Westcott and Yoonjung Seo

March 29, 2018

Excerpts

The leaders of North and South Korea will meet on April 27 for the first time since 2007, the two countries announced Thursday after high-level talks.

The landmark meeting between President Moon Jae-in and Kim Jong Un will be held at Freedom House on the southern side of the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ), according to the joint statement issued after the talks.

Officials from both sides will hold working-level talks on April 4 to prepare for the meeting and agree on security and media arrangements, it added. …

The last Inter-Korean summit was held in October 2007, when then President Roh Moo-hyun met Kim’s father, Kim Jong Il. …

On Thursday, high-ranking Chinese diplomat and Politburo member Yang Jiechi arrived in Seoul to brief South Korean officials on the North Korean leader’s visit to Beijing.

The Kim-Moon summit will precede a bombshell encounter between the young North Korean leader and US President Donald Trump — the first time a sitting US leader has met with a member of the Kim dynasty. …

Thursday’s North and South Korean delegations were both headed by the same men who engaged in the first negotiations in January, after Pyongyang agreed to reopen diplomatic communications with Seoul.

Ri Son Gwon, chairman of Pyongyang’s “Committee for the Peaceful Reunification of the Country” led the North Korean delegation while Unification Minister Cho Myoung-gyon represents Seoul. …

This year’s diplomatic thaw comes in sharp contrast to 2017 when the peninsula appeared to be barreling toward conflict, with Kim overseeing a string of missile and nuclear tests and Trump promising “fire and fury” as Pyongyang threatened Guam, Hawaii and even the US mainland. …

Full report

——————

Surprise Meetings and Potential Pitfalls; Trump Preps for North Korea

By Kevin Liptak and Jeremy Diamond

March 29, 2018

Excerpts

President Donald Trump’s rosy outlook at the prospect of meeting with North Korean despot Kim Jong Un is about to hit a wall of hard truths erected by US allies, outside experts and officials within his administration. …

Privately, Trump has made clear to advisers that he wants the meeting to happen, expressing few reservations about the prospects of a face-to-face meeting with Kim, a source familiar with the ongoing negotiations said. But in the coming weeks, US officials and at least one key US ally will look to dampen that optimism.

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe will come bearing a list of concerns over Trump’s face-to-face with Kim when he arrives in the US next month to meet with the President, a person familiar with the Japanese efforts said. The meeting — which could occur at Trump’s Mar-a-Lago estate in Florida after he returns from a trip to South America — came at Abe’s insistence after learning that Trump had accepted an invitation to meet with Kim. …

Just this month — days before Trump quickly accepted North Korea’s invitation to meet — senior administration officials told reporters the US would not hold direct talks until North Korea takes “concrete steps” toward denuclearization. That condition has since been discarded, but now those officials are working to ensure Trump does not walk into his meeting with Kim with unduly high expectations.

“I wouldn’t say optimism is called for right now. I would be very cautious because … what North Korea expects out of this summit and what the US expect may not be potentially aligned,” said Sue Mi Terry, a former CIA analyst and North Korea expert. “Optimism is the last word I would use for this.” …

The planning for a summit has included Mike Pompeo, the director of the CIA whom Trump has tapped to become secretary of state. …

As the White House works to secure his confirmation, Pompeo and a team at the CIA have been working through intelligence backchannels to make preparations for the Kim talks. Meanwhile, officials at the State Department — led by Marc Knapper, the chargé d’affaires in Seoul, and Susan Thornton, the assistant secretary of State for East Asian and Pacific affairs — have been working separately to prepare for the summit. …

The efforts have fed into a working group convened by the National Security Council’s top Asia hand, Matthew Pottinger. …

US officials say the talks will most likely take place in late May — or perhaps even June — should they occur. …

The White House has declined to say whether official contact has yet been established between North Korea and Washington, which would allow US officials to confirm whether Kim had indeed vowed to halt missile and nuclear testing ahead of talks. In the absence of that confirmation, Trump and his aides have relied partly on the characterizations of the South Koreans, who came bearing the invitation earlier this month, and the Chinese, who provided a briefing to the White House on Tuesday after Kim and President Xi Jinping met in Beijing.

According to Chinese state media, Kim told Xi he was open to summit talks with Trump. But the North Koreans have not themselves confirmed Kim’s intent to meet with Trump.

“If South Korea and the United States respond with good will to our efforts and create an atmosphere of peace and stability, and take phased, synchronized measures to achieve peace, the issue of the denuclearization of the peninsula can reach resolution,” Kim said, according to Xinhua. …

Senior administration officials spent Wednesday trying to decipher North Korean intentions following Kim’s meeting with Xi. Some officials noted the optics — including body language and rhetoric — from both the North Koreans and the Chinese was hardly warm and fuzzy, determining the meeting appeared like it was for show.

China’s ambassador in Washington, Cui Tiankai, traveled to the White House on Tuesday afternoon to brief officials, confirming that it was indeed Kim who had paid a visit to President Xi Jinping. In their conversations, they dictated a message to Trump from Xi which was subsequently shared with the President. …

Full report

————————————————

Topical reports on this site

 

The Personality Profile of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un

Kim Jong Un poster
Click on image for larger view

Research paper

The Personality Profile of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, April 2018. Abstract and link for full-text (32 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: https://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/119/

 

The Personality Profile of U.S. President Donald Trump

Trump poster (2016)
Click on image for larger view

Research papers

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/



Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, Republican nominee in the 2012 U.S. presidential election, has announced his candidacy in the 2018 midterm election as Republican candidate for United States Senate to fill the vacancy created by the retirement of Utah’s Sen. Orrin Hatch.

Based on his psychological profile, Gov. Romney earns high marks for temperamental fitness and is well qualified to serve in “the world’s greatest deliberative body.”

Romney fits the profile of the dutiful conformist. Leaders with that particular personality profile are characteristically dignified, dependable, deliberative, prudent, proper, and more principled than most personality types. They are highly organized, with a strong work ethic and careful attention to detail, which accounts in part for Romney’s success in organizational and corporate management and financial restructuring.


Click on image for larger view

More » The Political Personality of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney. Paper presented at the 35th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Chicago, IL, July 6–9, 2012. Abstract and link for full-text (35 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/98/

 


Topical report

Why would Romney run? (Chris Cillizza, CNN, Feb. 16, 2018) — What makes Mitt run? That’s the question CNN editor-at-large put to Scott Helman, an editor at the Boston Globe and longtime “Mitt-storian.” Helman co-autored The Real Romney about the life and times of the two-time presidential candidate.

 


Related reports on Mitt Romney

Mitt Romney for Secretary of State? (Nov. 19, 2016)

Mitt Romney’s Personality Profile (June 2, 2011)


As shown in the pie chart, Romney has a primarily Conscientious-dutiful personality, complemented by secondary Dominant-asserting, Ambitious-confident, and Accommodating-cooperative features and a minor Retiring-reserved tendency.

Mitt Romney’s Leadership Style (Sept. 3, 2012)


Research assistants Amanda Nusbaum and Feiran Chen presented their research on “The Personality Profile of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney” at the College of St. Benedict in St. Joseph, Minn., July 30, 2012.

Why Mitt Romney Won’t Be President — In Theory (Oct. 29, 2012)


Aubrey Immelman and Andrew Obritsch in Chicago at the annual scientific meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology to present their research on Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, July 2012.



Fire and Fury: Inside the Trump White House

Jim VandeHei and Mike Allen (“The Wolff lines on Trump that ring unambiguously true,” Axios, Jan. 5, 2018) write:

“There are definitely parts of Michael Wolff’s ‘Fire and Fury’ that are wrong, sloppy, or betray off-the-record confidence. But there are two things he gets absolutely right, even in the eyes of White House officials who think some of the book’s scenes are fiction: his spot-on portrait of Trump as an emotionally erratic president, and the low opinion of him among some of those serving him.”

VandeHei and Allen categorize “lines from the book [that] ring unambiguously true” into four categories: (1) how Trump processes (and resists) information; (2) instinct over expertise; (3) ill-preparedness; and (4) low regard by key aides.

Following is a selection from VandeHei and Allen’s shortlist of “Fire and Fury” quotes, annotated with empirical research findings from studies conducted at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics.

How Trump processes (and resists) information:

  • “[Trump] seemed to lack the ability to take in third-party information.”
  • “Trump didn’t read. He didn’t really even skim. … [H]e could read headlines and articles about himself, or at least headlines on articles about himself, and the gossip squibs on the New York Post’s Page Six.”
  • “[Trump] trusted his own expertise — no matter how paltry or irrelevant — more than anyone else’s [see *Note]. What’s more, he had an extremely short attention span, even when he thought you were worthy of attention.”

Outgoing (histrionic) cognitive style: flighty/scattered — Avoids introspective thought, attentive to fleeting external events, and speaks in impressionistic generalities; integrates experiences poorly, resulting in scattered learning and thoughtless judgments. [*Note: Trusting one’s own expertise more than anyone else’s is a narcissistic trait.]

Instinct over expertise:

  • “[Trump was] a man who, while he knew little, was entirely confident of his own gut instincts and reflexive opinions, however frequently they might change.”

Ambitious (narcissistic) expressive behavior: confident/conceited — Self-confident, conveying an air of calm, untroubled self-assurance; tends to act in a conceited manner, shading into hubris, immodesty, or presumptuousness; self-promoting, displaying an inflated sense of self-importance.

Ill-preparedness:

  • “[T]he president’s views of foreign policy and the world at large were among [his White House's] most random, uninformed, and seemingly capricious aspects. His advisers didn’t know whether he was an isolationist or a militarist, or whether he could distinguish between the two.”

Outgoing (histrionic) cognitive style: flighty/scattered — Avoids introspective thought, attentive to fleeting external events, and speaks in impressionistic generalities; integrates experiences poorly, resulting in scattered learning and thoughtless judgments.

Low regard by key aides:

  • “He spoke obliviously and happily, believing himself to be a perfect pitch raconteur and public performer, while everyone with him held their breath.”

Ambitious (narcissistic) expressive behavior: confident/conceited — Self-confident, conveying an air of calm, untroubled self-assurance; tends to act in a conceited manner, shading into hubris, immodesty, or presumptuousness; self-promoting, displaying an inflated sense of self-importance.

  • “If a wackadoo moment occurred on the occasions … when his remarks careened in no clear direction, his staff had to go into intense method-acting response.”

Outgoing (histrionic) mood/temperament: poor impulse control — Animated, uninhibited, and emotionally responsive; moods subject to rapid fluctuation; may be over-excitable, exhibit a pervasive tendency to be easily enthused and as easily bored or angered, make thoughtless, imprudent judgments, and embark on rash or reckless courses of action.

  • “At points on the day’s spectrum of adverse political developments, he could have moments of, almost everyone would admit, irrationality. When that happened, he was alone in his anger and not approachable by anyone.”

Dominant (aggressive) mood/temperament: volatile — Prone to irritability; volatile temper that may at times be difficult to control, flaring readily into petty or contentious argument.

Recommended References for In-Depth Analysis

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/>

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/


Aug 21st, 2017


Donald Trump and Vladimir Putin are expected to have their first face-to-face encounter on the sidelines of the G20 summit in Hamburg, Germany, later this week.

Psychological Profile of Vladimir Putin

Putin-poster_revised
Click on image for larger view

The Political Personality of Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (36 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/104/

Psychological Profile of Donald Trump

Trump poster (2016)
Click on image for larger view

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/
The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/


Jun 12th, 2017

Pat Forte Obituary

Forte_Patrick_Obituary

Mass of Christian Burial will be 11:00 a.m. Thursday, June 15, 2017 at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church in Sartell for Patrick R. Forte, age 51, who passed away after a courageous battle with cancer. Rev. Tim Baltes will officiate and burial will be at Calvary Cemetery in Virginia, Minnesota, at a later date.

Visitation will be from 4-8 p.m. Wednesday at St. Francis Xavier Catholic Church and one hour prior to the services Thursday at the church. The Rosary will be prayed at 7:30 p.m. Wednesday at the church. Burial will be at a later date.

Patrick was born February 16, 1966 in Eveleth, Minnesota to Robert & Marjorie (Brauch) Forte. He was a graduate of Eveleth High School class of 1984. Pat attended and played hockey for the American International college in Springfield, Massachusetts and graduated from Bemidji State with a BA in Education and an MA from Hamline University. His elementary school teaching career spanned over 25 years including the Austin, Mora, Brainerd, and St. Cloud school districts. Pat’s focus of teaching was math and science.

Pat started his high school coaching career in Chisholm, Minnesota and went on to coach in Austin, Mora, Brainerd, St., Cloud, and Sartell. He spent 5 years working with the Minnesota Select 17s, 2 years in the Upper Midwest Elite League, and then on to St. John’s University in Collegeville.

In December 2016, Pat was presented with the “Spirit of Life Award” by the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame. The award is for those facing adversity in their life but still determined to give back to the game of hockey. He used his adversity to inspire others through motivational speaking engagements. In addition to his love of hockey, Pat enjoyed life, especially fishing, hunting, and golf with his son and many, many friends.

Survivors include his son, Nicholas, of Austin, MN; mother, Marjorie Forte, of Eveleth, MN; sisters, Barbara (Thomas) Lucarelli of Mounds View, MN, Diane (James) Juth of Rochester, MN, Catherine (Thomas) Harrington of Fridley, MN; nephews, Gino, Marco, Michael, Joseph, Jared; and nieces, Jenna and Jillian. He was preceded in death by his father, Robert Forte.

In lieu of flowers, memorials are preferred to St. Francis Xavier Church and the Youth Hockey Associations of Eveleth, Brainerd, St. Cloud, and Sartell.

————————————————

Related reports on this site

A Christmas Story

Forte_Pat-Nico_2008

Pat Forte Updates

Chaz Demm of the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame (left) and
Chaz Demm of the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame (left) and former coach Ron Castellano (right) present the ‘Spirit of Life’ award to Pat Forte at the National Hockey Center in November 2016.

———————————

Pat Forte Facebook



CNN reports that former Vice President Joe Biden is launching a political action committee, “American Possibilities PAC,” setting off speculation about a possible 2020 run for president:

While establishing the group could indicate Biden’s potential interest in another presidential bid, his comments on the subject in recent months have been varied.

Biden, who is 74 years old, gave a speech in New Hampshire last month, telling the first-in-the-nation primary state at the time that he was not running.

In the lead-up to the 2016 Democratic primary, Biden publicly mulled a run before standing down, citing his still-fresh grief from the death of his son Beau as a reason he did not mount a bid. Later, Biden expressed regret about this decision publicly, criticizing Hillary Clinton’s campaign and saying he thought he was a great candidate.

Earlier this month, he said he likely wouldn’t run in 2020, but did not write off the possibility.

The Personality Profile of Vice President Joe Biden

Jaclynn Beier, Brianna Ricci, Lindsey Holm, and Katie Carlson conducted a pilot study of the political personality of Joe Biden at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics in 2009.

Lindsey Holm and Jaclynn Beier present their research poster, "The Personality Profile of Vice President Joe Biden," at the 44th annual Minnesota Undergraduate Psychology Conference on April 18, 2009, at the College of Saint Benedict in St. Joseph, Minn.
Lindsey Holm and Jaclynn Beier present their research poster, “The Personality Profile of Vice President Joe Biden,” at the 44th annual Minnesota Undergraduate Psychology Conference on April 18, 2009, at the College of Saint Benedict in St. Joseph, Minn.

Biden poster
Click on image for larger view

A preliminary psychological analysis of U.S. vice president Joe Biden by Jaclynn Beier, Brianna Ricci, Lindsey Holm, Katie Carlson, and Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics revealed that Vice President Biden’s primary personality pattern is Dominant/asserting, complemented by secondary Outgoing/congenial and Ambitious/confident features. In summary, Biden’s personality composite can be characterized as a dominant extravert.

—————————

Related report

Joe Biden Concludes There’s No Time for a 2016 Run


A life-size cutout of the vice president was seen in June 2015 in the window of a Draft Joe Biden 2016 office in Chicago. (Photo credit: Andrew Nelles / The New York Times)

By Peter Baker and Maggie Habermank

October 21, 2015

WASHINGTON — Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr. announced on Wednesday [Oct. 21, 2015] that he would not run for president, ending a period of remarkably public agonizing and clearing away one of the biggest potential obstacles to Hillary Rodham Clinton’s path to the Democratic nomination in 2016. …

Full story

—————————————

Update: April 2, 2018

CNN’s “The Point with Chris Cillizza” reports:

A CNN poll, conducted by SSRS, shows that a top tier of potential Democratic contenders — all of them facing questions about whether they’ll run due to age and other factors — seems to be emerging: Former Vice President Joe Biden is the most broadly popular pick, with 84% of Democrats saying they are either very or somewhat likely to support his potential nomination. Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders comes next at 75%, followed by Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren at 68%.

Then there are three younger Democratic senators who are still building national name ID: California Sen. Kamala Harris: 53%; New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker: 50%; New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand: 48%.



May 22, 2017 Update

Research paper

The Political Personality of U.S. Vice President Mike Pence. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, May 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (19 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/118/

 


 

Olivia Musser, Lauren Lingenfelter, Claudia Luther, and Greta Schleif present “The Personality Profile of U.S. Vice President Mike Pence” at the College of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, Minn., April 27, 2017.
Olivia Musser, Lauren Lingenfelter, Claudia Luther, and Greta Schleif present “The Personality Profile of U.S. Vice President Mike Pence” at the College of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, Minn., April 27, 2017.

A preliminary psychological analysis of U.S. vice president Mike Pence by Greta Schleif, Claudia Luther, Lauren Lingenfelter, Kristie Vang, Andrew Weiler, Olivia Musser, and Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, revealed that Vice President Pence’s primary personality pattern is Conscientious/dutiful, complemented by secondary Dominant/asserting, Ambitious/confident, and Accommodating/cooperative features and a minor Outgoing/congenial tendency. In summary, Pence’s personality composite can be characterized as a conscientious deliberator.

Pence poster
Click on image for larger view

Abstract

The poster presents the results of an indirect assessment of the personality of U.S. vice president Mike Pence, from the conceptual perspective of personologist Theodore Millon. Information concerning Pence was collected from biographical sources and media reports and synthesized into a personality profile using the Millon Inventory of Diagnostic Criteria (MIDC), which yields 34 normal and maladaptive personality classifications congruent with Axis II of DSM–IV.

The personality profile yielded by the MIDC was analyzed on the basis of interpretive guidelines provided in the MIDC and Millon Index of Personality Styles manuals. Pence’s primary personality pattern was found to be Conscientious/dutiful, complemented by secondary Dominant/asserting, Ambitious/confident, and Accommodating/cooperative features and a minor Outgoing/congenial tendency.

In the absence of concurrent primary personality patterns serving to moderate or offset high conscientiousness, Pence may be described as a “conscientious deliberator” or “dutiful conformist” — very similar to 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Leaders with this personality profile are characteristically prudent, proper, dignified, dependable, and more principled than most personality types. They are highly organized, with a strong work ethic and careful attention to detail. Dutiful and diligent, conscientious leaders excel in crafting public policy, though they are not typically regarded as visionary or transformational leaders.

 


 

Topical report: April 16, 2018

Trump, Twitter Fingers Flying, Exclaims. Pence, Note Cards in Hand, Explains.


Vice President Mike Pence at the Summit of the Americas in Lima, Peru, on Saturday, April 14, 2018. He stepped in for President Trump at the summit meeting, an increasingly common role for Mr. Pence as the president appears not to relish international travel. (Photo credit: Juan Pabo Azabache / Associated Press via The New York Times)

By Julie Hirschfeld Davis

April 15, 2015

Excerpts

LIMA, Peru — As President Trump was tweeting “Mission Accomplished!” on Saturday morning after the strikes on Syrian chemical weapons facilities, Vice President Mike Pence was tackling what has become a familiar task: translating his boss’s outbursts into carefully honed language that could reassure world leaders and the public. …

It was the latest instance of Mr. Pence — as earnest, conventional and on-message a politician as Mr. Trump is irreverent, unorthodox and unscripted — working to smooth the rough edges of a president who routinely draws controversy. …

In Lima, armed with a thick binder of briefing materials, Mr. Pence delivered meticulously scripted statements printed on cards that he toted around the summit meeting site and read from faithfully, hitting on his main theme of preserving the region as a “hemisphere of freedom,” a phrase he repeated at least three times in his closing remarks. …

Mr. Pence’s disciplined delivery of the American message after the Syria strikes stood in contrast to the presidential tweet, which recalled an earlier president’s premature declaration of victory in Iraq and prompted a spate of bitter criticism. …

As Mr. Pence taxied for takeoff on Air Force Two on Friday for the trip to Lima, the president appeared to be focused elsewhere. He tapped out a tweet branding James B. Comey, the former F.B.I. director whose forthcoming memoir paints him as a liar and Mafia-style bully, “an untruthful slime ball.” Privately, Mr. Trump continued to seethe over the F.B.I. raid days earlier on his personal lawyer in a wide-ranging corruption investigation that he views as a grave threat. …

But the vice president labored in a way his boss does not to avoid creating controversies. Mr. Pence called elections scheduled for next month in Venezuela a “sham” that would not fool the world, but when a reporter asked whether the United States would refuse to recognize the outcome, he deferred to John J. Sullivan, the acting secretary of state, who was traveling with him, to state the official policy, so as not to risk diverging even slightly from it. …

Full report

 


 

Related reports on this site

The Personality Profile of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney (June 2, 2011)

Romney poster (2013)
Click on image for larger view

The Personality Profile of 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump (Aug. 9, 2015)

Trump poster (2016)
Click on image for larger view