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A preliminary psychological analysis of U.S. vice president Mike Pence by Greta Schleif, Claudia Luther, Lauren Lingenfelter, Kristie Vang, Andrew Weiler, Olivia Musser, and Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, revealed that Vice President Pence’s primary personality pattern is Conscientious/dutiful, complemented by secondary Dominant/asserting, Ambitious/confident, and Accommodating/cooperative features and a minor Outgoing/congenial tendency. In summary, Pence’s personality composite can be characterized as a conscientious deliberator.

Pence poster
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Abstract

The poster presents the results of an indirect assessment of the personality of U.S. vice president Mike Pence, from the conceptual perspective of personologist Theodore Millon. Information concerning Pence was collected from biographical sources and media reports and synthesized into a personality profile using the Millon Inventory of Diagnostic Criteria (MIDC), which yields 34 normal and maladaptive personality classifications congruent with Axis II of DSM–IV.

The personality profile yielded by the MIDC was analyzed on the basis of interpretive guidelines provided in the MIDC and Millon Index of Personality Styles manuals. Pence’s primary personality pattern was found to be Conscientious/dutiful, complemented by secondary Dominant/asserting, Ambitious/confident, and Accommodating/cooperative features and a minor Outgoing/congenial tendency.

In the absence of concurrent primary personality patterns serving to moderate or offset high conscientiousness, Pence may be described as a “conscientious deliberator” or “dutiful conformist” — very similar to 2012 Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney. Leaders with this personality profile are characteristically prudent, proper, dignified, dependable, and more principled than most personality types. They are highly organized, with a strong work ethic and careful attention to detail. Dutiful and diligent, conscientious leaders excel in crafting public policy, though they are not typically regarded as visionary or transformational leaders.

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Related reports on this site

The Personality Profile of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney (June 2, 2011)

Romney poster (2013)
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The Personality Profile of 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump (Aug. 9, 2015)

Trump poster (2016)
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Apr 27th, 2017




Following is a partial catalogue of psychological assessments of U.S. presidents and presidential candidates, foreign leaders, and rogue or terrorist leaders conducted at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics.

USPP-Website_header

U.S. Presidents and Presidential Candidates

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper by Aubrey Immelman, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper by Aubrey Immelman, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

The Political Personality of 2016 Democratic Presidential Nominee Hillary Clinton. Working paper by Aubrey Immelman, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (34 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/102/

Personality Profiles of the 2016 Republican Presidential Candidates. Forum lecture by Aubrey Immelman, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, November 5, 2015. Abstract and link for full-text (15 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/forum_lectures/136/

The Political Personality of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 35th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Chicago, July 6–9, 2012. Abstract and link for full-text (35 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/98/

The Political Personality of U.S. President Barack Obama. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Francisco, CA, July 7–10, 2010. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/25/

The Political Personality of 2008 Republican Presidential Nominee John McCain. Research report by Aubrey Immelman, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, September 2008. Abstract and link for full-text (26 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/115/

The Political Personality of 2004 Democratic Presidential Candidate John Kerry. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman and Adam Beatty at the 28th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Toronto, Canada, July 3–6, 2005. Abstract and link for full-text (25 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/29/

The Political Personalities of 2000 U.S. Presidential Candidates George W. Bush and Al Gore. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 23rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Seattle, WA, July 1–4, 2000. Abstract and link for full-text (49 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/35/

The Political Personalities of 1996 U.S. Presidential Candidates Bill Clinton and Bob Dole. Article by Aubrey Immelman, Leadership Quarterly, Vol. 9, No. 3, Special Issue: Political Leadership, Fall 1998, pp. 335–366. Abstract and link for full-text (32 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/3/

Foreign Leaders

The Political Personality of Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin. Working paper by Aubrey Immelman and Joe Trenzeluk, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (36 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/104/

The Political Personality of French President Nicolas Sarkozy. Paper presented by Pascal de Sutter and Aubrey Immelman at the 31st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Paris, France, July 9–12, 2008. Abstract and link for full-text (24 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/26/

The Political Personality of 2007 French Presidential Candidate Ségolène Royal. Paper presented by Pascal de Sutter and Aubrey Immelman at the 31st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Paris, France, July 9–12, 2008. Abstract and link for full-text (29 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/27/

The Political Personality of Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman and Adam Beatty at the 26th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Boston, MA, July 6–9, 2003. Abstract and link for full-text (28 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/30/

South Africa in Transition: The Influence of the Political Personalities of Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 17th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain, July 11–14, 1994. Abstract and link for full-text (39 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/41/

A Millon-Based Study of Political Personality: Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk — Part I: Method and Preliminary Results. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 16th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Cambridge, MA, July 6–11, 1993. Abstract and link for full-text (22 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/42/

A Millon-Based Study of Political Personality: Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk — Part II: Further Results and Implications. Unpublished manuscript by Aubrey Immelman, June 1994. Abstract and link for full-text (29 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/97/

Terrorist Leaders

The Personality Profile of al-Qaida Leader Osama bin Laden. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 25th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Berlin, Germany, July 16–19, 2002. Abstract and link for full-text (26 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/69/

“Bin Laden ’s Brain”: The Abrasively Negativistic Personality of Dr. Ayman al-Zawahiri. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman and Kathryn Kuhlmann at the 26th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Boston, MA, July 6–9, 2003. Abstract and link for full-text (38 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/31/

The Personality Profile of September 11 Hijack Ringleader Mohamed Atta. Paper presented by Aubrey Immelman at the 25th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Berlin, Germany, July 16–19, 2002. Abstract and link for full-text (28 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/32/

USPP_SJU USPP_CSB

The Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics (USPP) is a research program in the psychology of politics at St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict in Minnesota, directed by Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., associate professor of psychology, who specializes in the psychological assessment of presidential candidates and world leaders.

The Unit is operated solely for research and educational purposes. It does not advocate support for or defeat of any candidate for political office. Political analysis published by the director or research associates of the USPP is the personal opinion of those individuals, based on empirical analysis of personality in politics and the influence of personality traits on high-level leadership.



Evan El-Amin/Shutterstock
Photo: Evan El-Amin / Shutterstock via Psychology Today

Psychology Today recently (Jan. 31, 2017) reported:

In the several days since psychologist John Gartner posted a petition on Facebook declaring that Donald Trump must be removed from office because he has “a serious mental illness that renders him psychologically incapable of competently discharging the duties of President of the United States,” more than 18,000 psychologists, psychiatrists, and other mental health professionals have signed their agreement.

Gartner, a psychologist in private practice in Baltimore and New York, author of a psychobiography of Bill Clinton, and a former instructor in psychiatry at Johns Hopkins, contends that Trump “manifestly” meets the DSM-published criteria for at least three personality disorders: narcissistic personality disorder (NPD), antisocial personality disorder, and paranoid personality disorder. They are a “toxic brew” that in his view not only make Trump “dangerous” but add up to “malignant narcissism,” not a diagnosis formalized in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual [of mental disorders, published by the American Psychiatric Association] but a label coined by the German-born psychologist and psychoanalyst Erich Fromm.

An indirect personality assessment of Donald Trump conducted 2015–2016 from the conceptual perspective of psychologist Theodore Millon, employing the Millon Inventory of Diagnostic Criteria (MIDC), which is congruent with Axis II of DSM–IV, revealed that Trump’s predominant personality patterns are Ambitious/exploitative (Scale 2: a measure of narcissistic tendencies) and Outgoing/impulsive (Scale 3: a measure of histrionic tendencies), infused with secondary features of the Dominant/controlling pattern (Scale 1A: a measure of sadistic tendencies) and supplemented by a Dauntless/adventurous tendency (Scale 1B: a measure of antisocial and sensation-seeking tendencies).

The study found no empirical evidence of a Distrusting personality pattern (Scale 9: a measure of paranoid tendencies) — an integral component of malignant narcissism, a severely disturbed personality disorder characterized by narcissistic grandiosity, self-absorption, and lack of empathy; no constraints of conscience (an antisocial tendency); a paranoid orientation; and unconstrained aggression (sadism). Notably, Scale 1A (sadistic) and Scale 1B (antisocial) also failed to reach the MIDC scale elevation threshold of 24 required for inferring the existence of a personality disorder. Consequently, it cannot be concluded that Donald Trump is a malignant narcissist.

Donald-Trump_profile

MIDC-Scale-Scores_Donald-Trump

According to the Psychology Today report, psychiatrist Allen Frances — who helped write the criteria for personality disorders — views “public diagnoses being bandied about” as inaccurate and missing the point, because “they ignore the criterion that symptoms must be causing distress and impairment.” Donald Trump, according to Frances, “causes distress to others, not to himself … [and] is rewarded for his behaviors.”

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Update: February 24, 2017


Trump’s mental health: ‘The elephant in the room’ (“The Last Word with Lawrence O’Donnell,” MSNBC, Feb. 23, 2017) — As psychologists and psychiatrists continue to warn about President Trump’s mental health, the Columbia Journalism Review called Trump’s mental health “the elephant in the room.” Lee Siegel, who wrote the CJR column, and Dr. Lance Dodes join Lawrence. (Duration: 7:04)

 


Related report on this site

Donald Trump’s Narcissism Is Not the Main Issue (Aug. 11, 2016)

Confident-Narcissistic_spectrum Sociable-Histrionic_spectrum
© 2015 MILLON® (Click on images for larger view)



Russia Compiles Psychological Dossier on Trump for Putin

By Bill Neely

February 20, 2017

MOSCOW — A dossier on Donald Trump’s psychological makeup is being prepared for Russian President Vladimir Putin.

Among its preliminary conclusions is that the new American leader is a risk-taker who can be naïve, according to a senior Kremlin adviser.

Trump “doesn’t understand fully who is Mr. Putin — he is a tough guy,” former Deputy Foreign Minister Andrei Fedorov told NBC News.

Added content: Psychological Profile of Vladimir Putin

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The file is being compiled by retired diplomats and some of Putin’s staff, he added.

The attempt to get inside the U.S. president’s mind is aimed at helping Putin plan for his first meeting with America’s new leader, the date for which is yet to be decided.

“Very serious preparatory work is going on in the Kremlin, including a paper — seven pages — describing a psychological portrait of Trump [link added], especially based on this last two to three months, and the last weeks,” added Fedorov, who said he has known Trump since 2000.

The dossier was being revised regularly, he said, adding that many in the Kremlin believed that Trump viewed the presidency as a business.

Fedorov added: “Trump is not living in a box — he is living in a crowd. He should listen to the people around him especially in the areas where he is weak.”

It is normal for any president or leader to be fully briefed before entering negotiations for the first time with a rival leader, but preparing a detailed dossier on the mind and instincts of a U.S. leader is unusual. …

Full report


 

Related reports

A psychological study of Donald Trump conducted at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics revealed that Trump’s predominant personality patterns are outgoing/impulsive and ambitious/exploitative (a measure of narcissism), infused with secondary features of the dominant/controlling pattern and low conscientiousness — a personality composite characterized as a “high-dominance charismatic.”

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

 


Related reports on this site

The Personality Profile of 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump (Aug. 9, 2015)

Trump poster (2016)
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Hillary Clinton Seeks Advice from ‘Psychology Experts’ on Donald Trump’s Personality Profile for Debate Prep (Aug. 31, 2016)

Trump_pie-chart_2016
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Jan 31st, 2017

The Eugene J. McCarthy Center for Public Policy & Civic Engagement is hosting a panel discussion on “Donald Trump: What Will Happen in the Next Four Years” on Tuesday, January 31 at 5:15 p.m.

Trump_McCarthy-Center

Recent reports by the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics related to the discussion topic:

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump » http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump » http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/



More than a decade after the study was conducted, the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics has publicly released its personality profile of U.S. Supreme Court associate justice Clarence Thomas. The report was prepared for the Washington Post’s Kevin Merida as part of the background research for his book, with Michael Fletcher, Supreme Discomfort: The Divided Soul of Clarence Thomas (2007).

Clarence-Thomas_Supreme-Discomfort Immelman-quote_Clarence-Thomas_Supreme-Discomfort_p-5

The Personality of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Research report, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, July 2004. Abstract and link for full-text (22 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/108/

Justice Clarence Thomas’s primary personality patterns were found to be Contentious/oppositional and Reticent/inhibited, with secondary features of the Conscientious/respectful pattern.

The amalgam of Contentious and Reticent patterns in Justice Thomas’s profile suggests the presence of an adaptive, nonpathological variant of Millon’s conflicted avoidant syndrome. People with this personality composite seek social acceptance while simultaneously anticipating rejection and disillusionment. They have a disproportionate fear of failure and humiliation, but see little alternative but to depend on supporting persons and institutions, which kindles resentment. To protect themselves from the feelings of anger and anxiety prompted by this inner conflict, they tend to withdraw from social interaction or public view.

The major implication of the study is that it offers an empirically based personological framework for understanding the enigmatic Justice Clarence Thomas, who claims to be untroubled by the harsh judgment of his critics while simultaneously casting himself as a besieged victim. In truth, he is hypersensitive to rejection and deeply resentful of his detractors, yet his strong need for acceptance and respect make it difficult for him to confront his critics directly, which carries the risk of further alienation.


Jan 23rd, 2017

What Kind of President? Trump, ‘High-Dominance Charismatic’

Trump-Pence_inauguration
President-elect Donald Trump leans over to talk with Vice President-elect Mike Pence during the 58th Presidential Inauguration at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, Friday, Jan. 20, 2017. (Photo: Andrew Harnik / AP via St. Cloud Times)

By Aubrey Immelman
St. Cloud Times
January 20, 2017

On Friday, Donald J. Trump was inaugurated as the 45th president of the United States in what, for some, was not so much an occasion for celebration as one of trepidation. In fact, no less than his predecessor painted Trump during the election campaign as “not qualified to be president.”

That raises the question: Does Trump have what it takes, in his words, to “Make America Great Again?” With no political track record in elected office, it’s difficult indeed to anticipate how Trump will lead.

Window to the future

Political psychology offers a window to the future. That’s because personality — a person’s ingrained behavior patterns — dictates how that individual will act over time in a broad variety of situations. In short, accurate personality assessment allows us to anticipate leadership behavior.

As previously reported (“Trump’s personality raises red flags,” Nov. 26, 2016), a psychological study of Trump conducted at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics revealed that Trump’s predominant personality patterns are outgoing/impulsive and ambitious/exploitative (a measure of narcissism), infused with secondary features of the dominant/controlling pattern and low conscientiousness — a personality composite characterized as a “high-dominance charismatic.”

Because presidential behavior is dictated as much by circumstances and structural constraints on the power of the presidency as by personality — frequently more so — personality analysis can go only so far, painting presidential prospects in broad strokes rather than minute detail. In short, personality can point only to the general tenor of a prospective presidency.

Trump’s likely leadership style

As a “high-dominance charismatic” Trump assumes the mantle of leadership with a Clintonian combination of extraversion and self-confidence, buttressed by a level of dominance not seen since Lyndon B. Johnson. In addition, he is practically devoid of his predecessor’s accommodating disposition (“Obama is a ‘confident conciliator,’ ” Sept. 8, 2012) or George H.W. Bush’s prudent conscientiousness.

Trump’s psychological profile raises the following generalized expectancies regarding his leadership style as president:

  • Leadership motivation: power, self-validation, pragmatism. As an extraordinarily confident individual with an unshakable belief in his own talents, leadership ability, and potential for success, a quest for power will be the prime motivator for Trump’s leadership behavior, punctuated by a need to control situations and dominate adversaries. Furthermore, Trump’s outgoing nature suggests concern with popular approval and a striving for self-validation to affirm his inflated self-esteem. In addition, he will likely be more pragmatic than ideological to consummate his political objectives.
  • Leadership orientation: goal directed, loyalty expected. Given his supreme self-confidence and high dominance, Trump will likely be more goal directed than relationship oriented. As a task-oriented leader, Trump will not permit the maintenance of good relations to stand in the way of goal achievement. This orientation will be offset to some extent by Trump’s outgoing tendencies which, in addition, will also prime him to place a high premium on loyalty among his advisors and members of his administration.
  • Job performance: energy dynamo. Big egos have a strong drive to prove themselves. Thus, Trump can be expected to be tireless in the amount of effort invested in carrying out the duties of his office. This tendency will be reinforced by strong power motivation stemming from high dominance and boundless energy derived from his extraverted, outgoing personality.
  • Managerial style: advocate, not consensus builder. In organizing and managing the decision-making process, Trump will be heavy on self-promotion and persuasion, making him more of an advocate for his policy agenda than a consensus builder or an arbitrator.
  • Dealing with Congress: competitive, controlling. In dealing with Congress, Trump will most likely act in a competitive and controlling manner — though he certainly is capable of behaving in a cooperative, harmonious fashion if he believes it will further his own self-interest.
  • The people and the press: active, uncooperative. In relating to the public, outgoing, confident leaders such as Trump typically are active and engaged, articulating and defending their policies in person rather than relying on surrogates and proxies. This tendency will be reinforced by Trump’s dominant, strong-willed, outspoken personality and fueled by his extraversion, which will feed his preference for direct engagement with the public. As for media relations, Trump will maintain a measure of harmony with the press, to the extent he feels he can call the shots. However, the likelihood of a highly critical press, in conjunction with Trump’s sensitivity to personal slights, portends a relatively closed relationship with the media characterized by a lack of cooperation that could quickly escalate to outright hostility.

Rash words may be par for the course in the heat of political campaigns and calling Trump unqualified may be best consigned to that particular chapter in the annals of presidential history. What cannot be denied is that President Trump counts among the least experienced incumbents in recent memory. Time will tell if Trump is equal to the daunting task he now faces in this new chapter of his illustrious, if checkered, career — and whether personality will be destiny.

This is the opinion of Aubrey Immelman, associate professor of psychology at the College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University, where he directs a faculty-student collaborative research program in political psychology, the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics. Immelman specializes in the psychological assessment of presidential candidates and world leaders.

 


 

Related reports

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

 


 

Related reports on this site

The Personality Profile of 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump (Aug. 9, 2015)

Trump poster (2016)
Click on image for larger view

A Question of Temperament: Donald Trump’s Fitness to Lead (Dec. 4, 2016)

immelman_trump-1_jasonwachter-stcloudtimes_2016-11-16
College of St. Benedict/St. John’s University professor Aubrey Immelman, who predicted Donald Trump would win over Hillary Clinton based on their personality profiles, shown Wednesday, Nov. 16, 2016. Immelman has predicted presidential winners correctly for the past 20 years. (Photo: Jason Wachter / St. Cloud Times)



U.S. Military Deaths in Operation Freedom’s Sentinel
(Afghanistan)

As of Saturday, December 31, 2016, at least 2,392 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Uzbekistan as a result of the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to iCasualties.org.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 17,674 U.S. service members have been wounded as of Sept. 30, 2012, the latest number reported by iCasualties.org.


Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Matthew Q. McClintock, Albuquerque, New Mexico, died Jan. 5, 2016 in Marjah District, Afghanistan, from wounds suffered when the enemy attacked his unit with small-arms fire. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 19th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Washington National Guard, Buckley, Washington.


Navy Petty Officer 2nd Class Andrew J. Clement, 38, Massachusetts, died June 21, 2016 of a noncombat-related injury while deployed to Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti. He was a mobilized Navy reservist assigned to the Navy Reserve Unit Tactical Air Control Squadron 22, Navy Operational Support Center (NOSC), Quincy, Massachusetts, forward deployed to Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti.


Army Staff Sgt. Christopher A. Wilbur, 36, Granite City, Illinois, died Aug. 12, 2016 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, from a noncombat-related injury. He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division, in Fort Carson, Colorado.


Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Matthew V. Thompson, 28, Irvine, California, died Aug. 23, 2016 in Lashkar Gah, Helmand Province, Afghanistan, of injuries caused by an improvised explosive device that detonated near his patrol while conducting dismounted operations. He was assigned to 3rd Battalion, 1st Special Forces Group (Airborne), Joint Base Lewis-McChord, Washington.


Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Adam S. Thomas, 31, Tacoma Park, Maryland, died Oct. 4, 2016 in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, from injuries caused by an improvised explosive device that exploded during dismounted operations. He was assigned to B Company, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.


Army Sgt. Douglas Riney, 26, Fairview, Illinois, died Oct. 19, 2016 in a shooting attack at Camp Morehead, Afghanistan, an ammunition supply point outside Kabul. He was assigned to the Support Squadron, 3rd Cavalry Regiment, at Fort Hood, Texas. The shooter was reportedly wearing an Afghan army uniform.


Army civilian Michael Sauro, 40, McAlester, Oklahoma, died Oct. 19, 2016 in a shooting attack at Camp Morehead, Afghanistan, an ammunition supply point outside Kabul. He was assigned to the Defense Ammunition Center, McAlester Army Ammunition Point. The shooter was reportedly wearing an Afghan army uniform.


Army Green Beret Capt. Andrew D. Byers, 30, Rolesville, North Carolina, died Nov. 3, 2016 in Kunduz, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained while engaging enemy forces. He was assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.


Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Ryan A. Gloyer, 34, Greenville, Pennsylvania, died Nov. 3, 2016 in Kunduz, Afghanistan, of wounds sustained while engaging enemy forces. He was assigned to Company B, 2nd Battalion, 10th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Carson, Colorado.


Army Pfc. Tyler R. Iubelt, 20, Tamaroa, Illinois, died Nov. 12, 2016 in Bagram, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained from an improvised explosive device (suicide bomber). He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Sustainment Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas.


Army Sgt. John W. Perry, 30, Stockton, California, died Nov. 12, 2016 in Bagram, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained from an improvised explosive device (suicide bomber). He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Sustainment Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas.


Army Sgt. 1st Class Allan E. Brown, 46, Takoma Park, Maryland, died Dec. 6, 2016 at Walter Reed National Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, of injuries sustained from an improvised explosive device (suicide bombing) in Bagram, Afghanistan, that occurred on Nov. 12. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Special Troops Battalion, 1st Sustainment Brigade, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas.

DOD

U.S. Military Deaths in Operation Inherent Resolve
(ISIS/ISIL in Syria and Iraq)

As of Saturday, December 31, 2016, at least 4,512 members of the U.S. military had died in the Middle East since the invasion of Iraq in March 2003, according to according to iCasualties.org.

Since the start of U.S. military operations in Iraq, 32,223 U.S. service members have been wounded as of Nov. 30, 2011, the latest number reported by iCasualties.org.

Major John David Gerrie, USAF
Air Force Maj. John D. Gerrie, 42, Nickerson, Kansas, died Jan. 16, 2016 in Al Udeid Air Base, Qatar, from a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to 453rd Electronic Warfare Squadron, Joint Base San Antonio-Lackland, Texas.


Navy civilian Blane D. Bussell, 60, Virginia, died Jan. 26, 2016 in Manama, Bahrain, of noncombat-related causes. He was assigned to Forward Deployed Regional Maintenance Center Detachment Bahrain at Naval Support Activity Bahrain.


Marine Staff Sgt. Louis F. Cardin, Temecula, California, died March 19, 2016 in northern Iraq, from wounds suffered when the enemy attacked his unit with rocket fire. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 6th Marine Regiment, 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, Camp Lejeune, North Carolina.


Air Force Airman 1st Class Nathaniel H. McDavitt, 22, Glen Burnie, Maryland, died April 15, 2016 in Southwest Asia as a result of injuries sustained after extreme winds caused structural damage to the building in which he was working. He was assigned to the 52nd Equipment Maintenance Squadron at Spangdahlem Air Base, Germany.


Navy civilian Marcus D. Prince, 22, Norfolk, Virginia died April 26, 2016 in Juffir, Bahrain, of noncombat-related causes. He was assigned to USNS Pecos (T-AO 197).


Navy civilian Michael M. Baptiste, 60, Brooklyn, New York, died April 28, 2016 in Juffir, Bahrain, of noncombat-related causes. He was assigned to Forward Deployed Regional Maintenance Center Detachment Bahrain at Naval Support Activity Bahrain.


Navy Special Warfare Operator 1st Class Charles H. Keating IV, 31, San Diego, California, died May 3, 2016 in Tall Usquf, Iraq, of combat-related causes after Islamic State militants penetrated Kurdish defensive lines. He was assigned to a West Coast-based Navy SEAL Team. Keating’s was the third American combat death in Iraq since the U.S. military deployed advisers and other personnel there in 2014 to support the war against the Islamic State.


Army National Guard 1st Lt. David A. Bauders, Seattle, Wash., died May 6, 2016 on Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, in a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to the Washington National Guard’s 176th Engineer Company, Snohomish, Wash.


Navy Gunner’s Mate Seaman Connor Alan McQuagge, 19, from Utah, died May 26, 2016 of a noncombat-related injury while underway in the Red Sea. He was assigned to USS Harpers Ferry (LSD 49), forward deployed in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations.


Air Force 1st Lt. Anais A. Tobar, 25, Miami, Florida, died July 18, 2016 in Southwest Asia from a noncombat-related injury. She was assigned to the 4th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Seymour Johnson Air Force Base, North Carolina.


Air Force Lt. Col. Flando E. Jackson, 45, Lansing, Michigan, died Aug. 4, 2016 in Southwest Asia from a noncombat-related injury. He was assigned to the 194th Wing, Camp Murray, Washington National Guard, Washington.


Army 1st Lt. Jeffrey D. Cooper, 25, Mill Creek, Washington, died Sept. 10, 2016 in Kuwait, from a noncombat-related injury. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 2nd Battalion, 502nd Infantry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, Fort Campbell, KY.


Army Warrant Officer Travis R. Tamayo, 32, Brownsville, Texas, died Sept. 16, 2016 in Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, in a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to the 202nd Military Intelligence Battalion, Fort Gordon, Georgia.


Navy Chief Petty Officer Jason C. Finan, 34, Anaheim, California, died Oct. 20, 2016 in northern Iraq, of wounds sustained in an improvised explosive device blast. He was assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Three.


Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Matthew C. Lewellen, 27, Lawrence, Kan., died Nov. 4, 2016 in Jafr, Jordan, of wounds sustained when his convoy came under fire entering a Jordanian military base. He was assigned to the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Campbell, Kentucky.


Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Kevin J. McEnroe, 30, Tucson, Ariz., died Nov. 4, 2016 in Jafr, Jordan, of wounds sustained when his convoy came under fire entering a Jordanian military base. He was assigned to the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Campbell, Kentucky.


Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. James F. Moriarty, 27, Kerrville, Texas, died Nov. 4, 2016 in Jafr, Jordan, of wounds sustained when his convoy came under fire entering a Jordanian military base. He was assigned to the 5th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Campbell, Kentucky.


Army Spc. Ronald L. Murray Jr., Bowie, Maryland, died Nov. 10, 2016 in Kuwait in a noncombat-related incident (vehicle accident). He was assigned to 4th Battalion, 1st Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss, Texas.


Navy Senior Chief Petty Officer Scott C. Dayton, 42, Woodbridge, Virginia, died Nov. 24, 2016 in northern Syria, of wounds sustained in an improvised explosive device blast. He was assigned to Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit Two, based in Virginia Beach, Virginia.

DOD

U.S. Military Deaths in Operation Odyssey Lightning
(ISIS/ISIL in Libya)


Navy Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Fuels) Airman Devon M. Faulkner, 24, North Carolina, died Sept. 20, 2016 of a noncombat-related injury while underway. He was assigned to USS Wasp (LHD 1), forward deployed in the central Mediterranean Sea.


2017 UPDATES: Operation Freedom’s Sentinel (Afghanistan)


Army Green Beret Sgt. 1st Class Robert R. Boniface, 34, San Luis Obispo, California, died March 19, 2017 in Logar Province, Afghanistan, from a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group, Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.


Army Green Beret Staff Sgt. Mark R. De Alencar, 37, Edgewood, Maryland, died April 8, 2017 in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when his unit came in contact with enemy forces using small-arms fire during combat operations. He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne), Eglin Air Force Base, Florida.


2017 UPDATES: Operation Inherent Resolve (ISIS/ISIL in Syria-Iraq)


Army Spc. Isiah L. Booker, of Cibolo, Texas, died Jan. 7, 2017 in Jordan, in a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 5th Special Forces Group, Fort Campbell, Kentucky.


Army Spc. John P. Rodriguez, Hemet, Calif., died Jan. 12, 2017 in the U.S. Central Command area of responsibility in a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to 2nd Engineer Battalion, 3rd Armored Brigade Combat Team, 1st Armored Division, Fort Bliss,Texas.


Navy Chief Special Warfare Operator William “Ryan” Owens, 36, Peoria, Illinois, died Jan. 28, 2017 in the Arabian Peninsula of Yemen, of wounds sustained in a raid against al-Qaida in support of U.S. Central Command Operations. He was assigned to an East Coast-based Special Warfare unit. (Chief Petty Officer Owens as the first American war casualty under Commander in Chief Donald Trump.)


Army Pfc. Brian. P. Odiorne, 21, Ware, Massachusetts died Feb. 20,2017 in Al Anbar Province, Iraq, from a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 82nd Field Artillery Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood,Texas.


Air Force Staff Sgt. Alexandria Mae Morrow, 25, Dansville, NY, died March 22, 2017 in Southwest Asia while performing maintenance duties in support of combat operations. She was assigned to the 366th Aircraft Maintenance Squadron, Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho.


Air Force Staff Sgt. Austin Bieren, 25, Umatilla, Oregon, died March 28, 2017 in northern Syria in a noncombat-related incident while deployed in support of combat operations. He was assigned to the 21st Space Wing at Peterson Air Force Base, Colorado.


Casualties At a Glance: Deaths by Conflict

Operation Odyssey Lightning: 1

Operation Inherent Resolve: 19

Operation Freedom’s Sentinel: 24

Operation Enduring Freedom: 2346

Operation New Dawn: 67

Operation Iraqi Freedom: 4410

Source: Military Times database

Remember Their Sacrifice

Remember Their Sacrifice

Related links

Iraq Casualties

Afghanistan Casualties

Honor the Fallen

Click to visit the Military Times Hall of Valor

Visit Military Times — The top source for military news

Faces of the Dead
An interactive look at each U.S. service member who died in Afghanistan or Iraq



President Barack Obama, in a Dec. 26 interview with David Axelrod for his “Axe Files” podcast produced by CNN and the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics, suggested that, had he been able to run, he could have won a third term in the White House.

“I am confident that … if I had run again … I think I could’ve mobilized a majority of the American people.”


David Axelrod interviews President Barack Obama on “The Axe Files” from CNN and the University of Chicago’s Institute of Politics, Dec. 26, 2016. (Photo: Gabriella Demczuk / CNN)

Fox News reports that President-elect Donald Trump fired back in a tweet: “President Obama said that he thinks he would have won against me. He should say that but I say NO WAY!”

trump_tweet_12-26-2016

The Presidential Electability Index (PEI) developed at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics (USPP), which has accurately predicted the outcome of every presidential election since 1996, suggests that Donald Trump would beat Barack Obama in a hypothetical presidential election matchup.

Research on the psychology of politics conducted at the USPP reveals that voters respond favorably to candidates who are outgoing (extraverted), self-confident (productively narcissistic), and dominant; and negatively to candidates who are introverted and overly conscientious. Based on those criteria, Trump has the edge over Obama, as shown by the PEI political impact scores below:

Donald Trump: PEI = 65

Scale:   1A    1B    2    3    4    5A    5B    6    7    8
Score:  17      9   24  24  0      0      4      0   0    0

Scale: 1A = 17; 2 = 24; 3 = 24; 6 = 0; 8 = 0

[Extraversion (scale 3) = 24] + [Narcissism (scale 2) = 24] + [Dominance (scale 1A) = 17] – [Introversion (scale 8) = 0] – [Conscientiousness (scale 6) = (2 – 2) = 0] = 65 – 0 = 65

Donald Trump: PEI = 45 (dysfunctionality adjusted)

Scale:   1A    1B    2    3    4    5A    5B    6    7    8
Score:  15     11  15  15    1      0      6      2    1    0

Scale: 1A = 15; 2 = 15; 3 = 15; 6 = 2; 8 = 0

[Extraversion (scale 3) = 15] + [Narcissism (scale 2) = 15] + [Dominance (scale 1A) = 15] – [Introversion (scale 8) = 0] – [Conscientiousness (scale 6) = (2 – 2) = 0] = 45 – 0 = 45

Barack Obama: PEI = 28

Scale:   1A  1B   2   3   4   5A  5B   6   7   8   9   0
Score:  10    6   11  9   7     1     2    5   4   1   0   4

Obama: [Extraversion (scale 3) = 9] + [Narcissism (scale 2) = 11] + [Dominance (scale 1) = 10] – [Introversion (scale 8) = 1] – [Conscientiousness (scale 6) = (5 - 4)] = 28

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PEI Scores for Democratic and Republican Nominees, 1996-2016

For historical context, here are the personality-based electability scores for all major-party nominees since 1996, published before Super Tuesday in presidential election years, with the successful candidate listed first:

 


 

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Projecting the Winner of the 2016 Presidential Election: The Presidential Electability Index (Feb. 29, 2016)

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Clinton vs. Trump: Predicting the 2016 Presidential Election Results (Nov. 8, 2016)

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Presidential Electability Index Predicted Donald Trump Win (Dec. 19, 2016)

sctimes_trump-win-prediction_featured-image

The Personality Profile of 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump (Aug. 9, 2015)

Trump poster (2016)
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More » The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

The Personality Profile of 2008 Democratic Presidential Candidate Barack Obama (Nov. 2, 2008)

Poster_Obama
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More » The Political Personality of U.S. President Barack Obama. Paper presented at the 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Francisco, CA, July 7–10, 2010. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/25/