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    Apr 25th, 2014




    U.S. Military Deaths in Afghanistan

    As of Monday, March 31, 2014, at least 2,315 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Uzbekistan as a result of the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to iCasualties.org.

    Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 17,674 U.S. service members have been wounded as of Sept. 30, 2012, according to iCasualties.org.

    Identifications: None

    No U.S. military deaths were reported in Afghanistan for the month of March, 2014.

    No U.S. service member died in Afghanistan in March 2014.

    ——————————

    APRIL UPDATES


    Army Capt. James E. Chaffin III, 27, West Columbia, S.C., died April 1, 2014 in Kandahar, Afghanistan, of a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to the 3rd Battalion, 319th Field Artillery Regiment, 1st Brigade Combat Team, 82nd Airborne Division, Fort Bragg, N.C.


    Army Spc. Kerry M. G. Danyluk, 27, Cuero, Texas, died April 15, 2014 at Landstuhl Regional Medical Center, Germany, of injuries sustained April 12 when enemy forces attacked his unit with small-arms fire in Pul-e-Alam, Logar province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 87th Infantry Regiment, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Related links

    Iraq Casualties

    Afghanistan Casualties

    Honor the Fallen

    Click to visit the Military Times Hall of Valor

    Visit Military Times — The top source for military news

    Faces of the Dead
    An interactive look at each U.S. service member who died in Afghanistan or Iraq



    The Personality Profile  of Russian President Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin
    (Влади́мир Влади́мирович Пу́тин)

    Aubrey Immelman
    Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics
    March 2014

    VladimirPutinNewYear2012-2.png

    A remotely conducted empirical psychological assessment of Russian leader Vladimir Putin is currently in progress, using the third edition of the Millon Inventory of Diagnostic Criteria (MIDC), which yields 34 normal and maladaptive personality classifications congruent with Axis II of DSM–V.

    Informal observation suggests that Putin is a highly dominant leader. However, more systematic observation is required to establish whether he is an introvert or an extravert.

    If Putin is a dominant introvert, which appears to be the case, the following personality-based leadership profile would apply:

    In terms of Lloyd Etheredge’s (1978) fourfold typology of personality-based foreign policy role orientations, which locates policymakers on the dimensions of dominance–submission and introversion–extraversion, high-dominance introverts (in American politics, presidents such as Woodrow Wilson and Herbert Hoover) are quite willing to use military force, tending

    to divide the world, in their thought, between the moral values they think it ought to exhibit and the forces opposed to this vision. They tend to have a strong, almost Manichean, moral component to their views. They tend to be described as stubborn and tenacious. They seek to reshape the world in accordance with their personal vision, and their foreign policies are often characterized by the tenaciousness with which they advance one central idea. … [These leaders] seem relatively preoccupied with themes of exclusion, the establishment of institutions or principles to keep potentially disruptive forces in check. (p. 449; italics in original)

    Etheredge’s high-dominance introvert is similar in character to Margaret Hermann’s (1987) expansionist orientation to foreign affairs. These leaders have a view of the world as being “divided into ‘us’ and ‘them,’ ” based on a belief system in which conflict is viewed as inherent in the international system. This world view prompts a personal political style characterized by a “wariness of others’ motives” and a directive, controlling interpersonal orientation, resulting in a foreign policy “focused on issues of security and status,” favoring “low-commitment actions” and espousing “short-term, immediate change in the international arena.” Expansionist leaders “are not averse to using the ‘enemy’ as a scapegoat” and their rhetoric often may be “hostile in tone” (pp. 168–169).

    If, on the other hand, Putin turns out to be a dominant extravert, the following thumbnail sketch would apply:

    High-dominance extraverts (such as U.S. presidents Theodore and Franklin Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and Lyndon Johnson) share high-dominance introverts’ tendency “to use military force”

    [b]ut in general … are more flexible and pragmatic, more varied in the wide range and scope of major foreign policy initiatives. … [In contrast to high-dominance introverts, they] want to lead rather than contain. They advocate change, seek to stir up things globally. … [and] are relatively more interested in inclusion [compared with high-dominance introverts, who favor exclusion], initiating programs and institutions for worldwide leadership and cooperative advance on a wide range of issues. (p. 449)

    From the perspective of Hermann’s (1987) sixfold typology, the best fit for the high-dominance extravert is the active-independent orientation to foreign affairs. These leaders, though recognizing the importance of other countries, are self-reliant and prefer to participate in international affairs on their own terms and without engendering a dependent relationship with other countries (p. 168).

    In terms of personal political style, they “[s]eek a variety of information before making a decision; examine carefully the possible consequences of alternatives under consideration for dealing with a problem; [and] cultivate relationships with a diverse group of nations” (Hermann, 1987, p. 169).

    The foreign policy resulting from an active-independent orientation is generally “focused on economic and security issues.” These leaders’ behaviors are “usually positive in tone but involves little commitment” because they “shun commitments that limit maneuverability and … independence” (Hermann, 1987, p. 169).

    In summary, preliminary findings suggests that Putin is more of an expansionist than an active-independent leader.

    References

    Etheredge, L. S. (1978). Personality effects on American foreign policy, 1898–1968: A test of interpersonal generalization theory. American Political Science Review, 72, 434–451.

    Hermann, M. G. (1987). Assessing the foreign policy role orientations of sub-Saharan African leaders. In S. G. Walker (Ed.), Role theory and foreign policy analysis (pp. 161–198). Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

    ————————————————

    Russia’s Military Capability

    Comparing the Military Capability of Putin’s Russia With the Soviet Union’s

    By Adam Taylor

    March 27, 2014


    Click for report full-scale graphics

    ————————————————

    Topical reports on this site

    Personality Profile: Vladimir Putin and Barack Obama

    Barack Obama’s Presidential Leadership Style (Sept. 8, 2012)


    Click on image for larger view

    A psychological profile of U.S. President Barack Obama, developed at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics during Obama’s 2008 and 2012 presidential campaigns, reveals that the president is a highly confident, moderately accommodating and deliberative, somewhat reserved personality type best described as a confident conciliator.


    Click on image for larger display

    As shown in the pie chart above, Obama is primarily an Ambitious/confident personality, complemented by secondary Accommodating/cooperative, Conscientious/respectful, and Retiring/reserved features.

    A Key to Success for Obama? (March 17, 2009)

    Barack Obama’s Leadership Style (Feb. 21, 2009)

    Barack Obama’s Decision-Making Style (Nov. 25, 2008)

    Barack Obama’s Personality Profile (Nov. 2, 2008)

    Full report: The Political Personality of U.S. President Barack Obama (PDF)



    U.S. Military Deaths in Afghanistan

    As of Friday, February 28, 2014, at least 2,315 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Uzbekistan as a result of the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to iCasualties.org.

    Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 17,674 U.S. service members have been wounded as of Sept. 30, 2012, according to iCasualties.org.

    Latest identifications:


    Army Pfc. Joshua A. Gray, 21, Van Lear, Ky., died Feb. 10, 2014 at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, from a noncombat-related incident. He was a satellite communications system operator-maintainer assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battalion, 10th Mountain Division, Fort Drum, N.Y.


    Army Spc. Christopher A. Landis, 27, Independence, Ky., died Feb. 10, 2014 at Bagram Airfield, Afghanistan, from wounds received when the enemy attacked his dismounted patrol with a rocket-propelled grenade in Kapisa Province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.


    Army Spc. John A. Pelham, 22, Portland, Ore., died Feb. 12, 2014 in Kapisa Province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he was struck by enemy small-arms fire in an “insider attack” by gunmen wearing Afghan security force uniforms. He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.


    Army Sgt. 1st Class Roberto C. Skelt, 41, York, Fla., died Feb. 12, 2014 in Kapisa Province, Afghanistan, of wounds suffered when he was struck by enemy small-arms fire in an “insider attack” by gunmen wearing Afghan security force uniforms. He was assigned to 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.


    Marine Corps Master Sgt. Aaron C. Torian, 36, Paducah, Ky., died Feb. 15, 2014 while conducting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to 2nd Marine Special Operations Battalion, Marine Special Operations Regiment, U.S. Marine Corps Forces Special Operations Command, Camp Lejeune, N.C.


    Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Caleb L. Erickson, 20, Waseca, Minn., died Feb. 28, 2014 while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.


    Air National Guard Master Sgt. David L. Poirier, 52, North Smithfield, R.I., died Feb. 28, 2014 from a noncombat-related incident at an undisclosed location in Southwest Asia. He was assigned to the 157th Operations Support Squadron, Pease Air National Guard Base, N.H.

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Related links

    Iraq Casualties

    Afghanistan Casualties

    Honor the Fallen

    Click to visit the Military Times Hall of Valor

    Visit Military Times — The top source for military news

    Faces of the Dead
    An interactive look at each U.S. service member who died in Afghanistan or Iraq


    Feb 7th, 2014

    Theodore Millon, a Student of Personality, Dies at 85


    Theodore Millon (Photo: The New York Times)

    By

    February 1, 2014

    Theodore Millon, a psychologist whose theories helped define how scientists think about personality and its disorders, and who developed a widely used measure to analyze character traits, died on Wednesday [Jan. 29, 2014] at his home in Greenville Township, N.Y. He was 85.

    The cause was complications of heart disease, his granddaughter Alyssa Boice said.

    Dr. Millon (pronounced “Milan,” like the city in Italy) learned about the oddities of personality at first hand, by wandering the halls of Allentown State Hospital, a mental institution, after being named to the hospital’s board in the 1950s as a part an overhaul effort in Pennsylvania. A young assistant professor at nearby Lehigh University at the time, he “frequently ventured incognito through the hospital,” he wrote in an essay in 2001, “at times clothed in typical hospital garb overnight or for entire weekend periods, conversing at length with patients housed in a variety of acute and chronic wards.”

    At the University of Illinois in the 1970s, he began to think and write more deeply about the patterns underlying specific character types that therapists had described: the narcissist, with fragile, grandiose self-approval; the dependent, with smothering clinginess; the histrionic, always in the thick of some drama, desperate to be the center of attention. By 1980, he had pulled together the bulk of the work on such so-called personality disorders, most of it descriptive, and turned it into a set of 10 standardized types [link added] for the American Psychiatric Association’s third diagnostic manual [DSM-III, Axis II].

    Along the way he developed the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory (MCMI), which became the most commonly used diagnostic assessment for personality problems. It is still widely used today, in its third edition, the MCMI-III.

    “He was a monumental figure in shaping the understanding of personality disorders,” said Thomas Widiger, a professor of psychology at the University of Kentucky. “Prior to Ted, there wasn’t any measure to speak of. He just dominated the field during a key period of its growth.”

    Theodore Millon was born in Manhattan on Aug. 18, 1928, the only child of Abner Millon, a tailor, and the former Mollie Gorkowitz. He grew up in the Bensonhurst neighborhood of Brooklyn and graduated from Lafayette High School in 1945 before earning bachelor’s degrees in psychology, physics and philosophy at City College of New York. After graduating in 1950, he earned a Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut in 1953, the year after he married Renée Baratz. She survives him, as do three daughters, Diane Bobb, Dr. Carrie Millon [link added] and Adrienne Hemsley; a son, Andy; and eight grandchildren.

    Loquacious and opinionated, Dr. Millon, who described himself as an exemplar of “secure narcissism,” became a kind of institution unto himself after laying a foundation for the study of personality disorders. He left the University of Illinois for the Coral Gables campus of the University of Miami, where — between visiting professorships at Harvard and McLean Hospital — he founded the Institute for Advanced Studies in Personology and Psychopathology, a platform to advance his ideas, publishing analyses, books and various personality assessments.

    Dr. Millon wrote more than 25 books and co-wrote more than 50 academic papers. The American Psychological Association awarded him its Gold Medal Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2008.

    In one of his books, an encyclopedia of behavioral scientists called “Masters of the Mind” (2004), he included an entry for “Theodore Millon (1928 — ).” Dr. Millon, he wrote of himself, was distinguished from many others in the book “by the fact that he appears, contrawise, to be invariably buoyant, if not jovial. Critics are not invariably enamored, however, finding his work to be, at times, too speculative, his writing unduly imaginative, and his creativity overly expansive.”

    ———

    A version of this article appeared in print on February 1, 2014, on page A21 of the New York edition with the headline: Theodore Millon, a Student of Personality, Dies at 85.

    ———

    Leading Personality Theorist, Psychologist and University of Miami Professor Theodore Millon Dies at 85


    Theodore Millon at his favorite desk. (Photo courtesy of the Millon family)

    By Howard Cohen
    MiamiHerald.com
    January 31, 2014

    Theodore Millon’s most significant memory of his youth, he wrote in a 2001 autobiography for his family, instigated by the events of 9/11, was one of familial warmth.

    Millon, a major figure in the field of psychology and the treatment of personality disorders, wrote: “[It] was my father’s all-consuming affection for me (the roots of my secure narcissism, I am sure), most charmingly illustrated by the fact that he brought home a gift for me (toy, game, book) every working day from the time I was 2 until I turned 13.”

    Millon, who died Wednesday at his home in Greenville Township, N.Y., at age 85, was born in Manhattan as the only child to immigrant parents from Lithuania and Poland and raised in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn. He would use these memories of his formative years in the development of diagnostic questionnaire tools such as the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory and earlier versions of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.

    Assessment tools

    These psychological assessment tools, for which he was a key contributor during his tenure with the Neuropsychiatric Institute of the University of Illinois Medical Center in Chicago in the late 1960s and ‘70s, are still used by clinicians and researchers, along with psychiatric drug regulation agencies and pharmaceutical companies, the health insurance industry and the legal system to classify and understand various disorders.

    “The profession’s acceptance of my upgraded assessment tools, especially the MCMI-III, has been exceptionally gratifying,” he wrote in his autobiography. “It ranks now second only to the MMPI (Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory) and the Rorschach as the most frequently employed of the psychodiagnostic tools in this country.”

    University of Miami

    Millon, who moved to Coral Gables in the late  ‘70s, would enjoy a lengthy run as clinical psych director at the University of Miami “as a retirement position” beginning in 1977, but he was customarily productive. Along with Neil Schneiderman, a physiological psychologist, he established a doctoral clinical health psychology program at UM.

    He was also a senior scientific scholar emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Personality and Psychopathology, and through his five-decade career taught at Lehigh and the University of Illinois and was a visiting professor at Harvard Medical School. He published more than 25 books, including his favorite, Masters of the Mind: Exploring the Story of Mental Illness from Ancient Times to the New Millennium (Wiley; $35), for which he led a reading at Coral Gables’ Books & Books in 2004. He earned his PhD from the University of Connecticut.

    “Teaching became my professional  raison d’être, one which I loved from the start and one I continue to cherish to this waning day of my academic career,” he wrote in 2001.

    Daughter Carrie Millon, of Pinecrest, followed her father’s lead into the field of psychology and worked with him at UM.

    Arts passion

    “He was an incredible man in so many ways,” she said. “You’re not supposed to brag … but what a brilliant, brilliant mind. He was the prototypical renaissance man.”

    That’s because Millon was passionate about the arts, too. He loved acting, singing, painting, sculpting and was an art collector and classical music aficionado.

    During high school, and as an undergrad at City College of New York, he was tempted into a theatrical or singing career — he sang with crooner Vic Damone and, as a kid, was best buddies with Maurice Sendak, an illustrator who would go on to fame with his children’s books, including Where the Wild Things Are, and the 1975 animated TV musical  Really Rosie with songwriter Carole King. These artsy vocations, his parents told him, were not befitting “a nice Jewish boy.” Academia and the field of psychology would have to do.

    But what fun he had in that Bensonhurst neighborhood. He wrote of sharing “Harry Potter-like” adventures on the front steps of his friends’ homes. These pals included Sendak and Wally, the only African-American youngster in their neighborhood and Marvin, a quiet and intelligent boy with a severe speech and hearing impairment.

    “Both were persona non-grata kids, poked fun at or completely shunned by both local peers and adults,” he remembered. “It was not any humanistic impulse or deviance on my part that drew me to them; I simply found both interesting and thoughtful peers.”

    Legacy

    Carrie Millon says that that love has been returned to the family in the numerous calls and correspondence that arrived from former students who learned that Millon’s health was failing.

    “We’ve had such an incredible outpouring of support from all over the place,” she said. “His greatest legacy was his students. And in every single letter we received, every one of them said, ‘You’re like a father to me.’ He was an incredibly generous man and that’s coming back to us in droves.”

    Millon is survived by his wife, Renée, whom he married in 1952, their children Diane Bobb, Carrie Millon, Andrew Millon, Adrienne Hemsley, eight grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and a niece and nephew. Services will be at 1 p.m. Sunday at Temple Sinai, 75 Highland Ave., Middletown, NY.

    The family would like to place a bench in Millon’s honor in Central Park. To make a donation, instead of flowers, write Central Park Conservancy, Attn: Adopt-a-Bench, 14 E. 60th St., New York, NY 10022 and cite Theodore Millon Bench.

    ——————

    OBITUARY

    Dr. Theodore Millon, Ph.D., D.Sc.

    Top Photo

    August 18, 1928 — January 29, 2014

    Greenville Township, NY

    Leading Personality Theorist and Psychologist, Dr. Theodore Millon, passed away on January 29, 2014, at his home in Greenville Township, NY, after a remarkable life.

    Dr. Millon was the author of over 25 books and the developer of numerous highly regarded diagnostic inventories including the MCMI. He was a key member of the DSM-III task force and of the DSM-IV’s workgroup on personality disorders. Dr. Millon was a Senior Scientific Scholar Emeritus at the Institute for Advanced Studies in Personality and Psychopathology, having served previously over a fifty-year sequence of professorial appointments at Lehigh, University of Illinois, University of Miami and Harvard. He received over twenty lifetime achievement awards, including APF’s Gold Medal for Lifetime Achievement in Applied Research, APA’s Distinguished Award for Applied Psychological Science, as well as its 2000 Presidential Citation.

    Theodore was born in Manhattan on August 28, 1928 to Abner and Mollie (Gorkowitz) Millon. He was raised in Bensonhurst, Brooklyn where he graduated from Lafayette High School in 1945. He earned his BA from the City College of New York ’49 and his Ph.D. from the University of Connecticut ’52 and later received an Honorary Doctorate from the Free University of Brussels ’94.

    He had a keen interest in art and was a man of many talents and interests. He loved acting and singing and was a painter, sculptor and collector of art.  Dr. Millon was a classical music aficionado, followed professional sports and studied physics as a hobby.

    In 1952 he married Renée Baratz. Although he was an admirable scholar, his role as a husband, father and grandfather was just as important to him. He was a kind, loving and generous man who cared deeply for his family. He is predeceased by his parents. In addition to his wife, he is survived by his children, Diane Bobb (Allen) of Greenville, NY; Dr. Carrie Millon of Pinecrest, FL; Andy Millon of Brooklyn, NY; Adrienne Hemsley (Martin) of White Plains, NY; a niece, Linda Shultz (David); a nephew, David Grabel; his grandchildren: Alyssa Boice (Rory), Katherine Sinsabaugh (Joseph), Molly Niedbala, Olivia Niedbala, Elizabeth Levin, Matthew Hemsley, Annie Hemsley, William Hemsley, and five great-grandchildren. He will not only be missed by his family, but by the many colleagues and students whose lives he influenced. His legacy was far reaching and will carry on. The family would also like to thank his caregivers, Leila Agustin and Elizabeth Grennille, for extending his life and bringing him great comfort.

    A private memorial service will be held.  In lieu of flowers, those wishing to make a donation may do so to the Central Park Conservancy, Attn: Adopt-A-Bench, 14 East 60th Street, New York, NY 10022.  Please write “Theodore Millon Bench” in the memo line, or call 212-310-6617.

    ———————————

    PHOTO GALLERY

    Ted Millon as a young professor in 1962. (Photo courtesy of Theodore Millon)
    Ted Millon as a young professor in 1962.
    (Photo courtesy of Theodore Millon)

    Millon-DSc_1994
    Theodore Millon receives an honorary Doctor of Science degree from Dean Hedwig Sloore at the Free University of Brussels, 1994. (Photo courtesy of Theodore Millon)


    Ted Millon, Ray Fowler (Executive Director Emeritus of the American Psychological Association), and Mel Sabshin (Medical Director Emeritus of the American Psychiatric Association) during Millon’s Festschrift weekend, Miami, Oct. 2003. (Photo courtesy of Theodore Millon)


    Dr. Theodore Millon receives the Gold Medal Award for Lifetime Achievement
    in the Application of Psychology at the 2008 annual meeting of the American
    Psychological Association in Boston, Mass.

    ———————————————————

    Books and Other Media

    ———————————————————

    PERSONAL REMINISCENCES

    In preparation. Please check back.


    With Ted Millon at an Institute for Advanced Studies in Personology and Psychopathology workshop, Oct. 17, 2002.



    U.S. Military Deaths in Afghanistan

    As of Friday, January 31, 2014, at least 2,309 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Uzbekistan as a result of the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to iCasualties.org.

    Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 17,674 U.S. service members have been wounded as of Sept. 30, 2012, according to iCasualties.org.

    Latest identifications:


    Marine Corps Sgt. Jacob M. Hess, 22, Spokane, Wash., died Jan. 1, 2014, while supporting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to Marine Aviation Logistics Squadron 26, Marine Aircraft Group 26, 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.


    Army Sgt. 1st Class William K. Lacey, 38, Laurel, Fla., died Jan. 4, 2014, in Nangarhar Province, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when the enemy attacked his unit with rocket-propelled grenades. He was assigned to 201st Brigade Support Battalion, 3rd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Knox, Ky.


    Army National Guard Chief Warrant Officer Andrew L. McAdams, 27, Cheyenne, Wyo., died Jan. 10, 2014 at Bagram Airfield, in Parwan Province, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when the aircraft he was aboard crashed. He was assigned to Detachment 53, Operational Support Airlift Command, Joint Force Headquarters, Wyoming Army National Guard, Cheyenne, Wyo.


    Army National Guard Sgt. Drew M. Scobie, 25, Kailua, Hawaii, died Jan. 10, 2014 at Bagram Airfield, in Parwan Province, Afghanistan, of injuries sustained when the aircraft he was aboard crashed. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Battery, 1st Battalion, 487th Field Artillery, Wahiawa, Hawaii Army National Guard, Oahu, Hawaii.


    Army Green Beret Sgt. Daniel T. Lee, 28, Crossville, Tenn., died Jan. 15, 2014 in Parwan Province, Afghanistan, from wounds suffered when enemy forces attacked his unit with small-arms fire during combat operations. He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 3rd Special Forces Group (Airborne), Fort Bragg, N.C.


    Army Spc. Andrew H. Sipple, 22, Cary, N.C., died Jan. 17, 2014 in Kandahar City, Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, from a noncombat-related incident. He was assigned to the 1st Battalion, 8th Cavalry Regiment, 2nd Brigade Combat Team, 1st Cavalry Division, Fort Hood, Texas.


    Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Edward Balli, 42, of Monterey, Calif., died Jan. 20, 2014 in Kandahar Province, Afghanistan, of wounds from small-arms fire when he was attacked by insurgents. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, U.S. Army Europe, Vilseck, Germany.

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Related links

    Iraq Casualties

    Afghanistan Casualties

    Honor the Fallen

    Click to visit the Military Times Hall of Valor

    Visit Military Times — The top source for military news

    Faces of the Dead
    An interactive look at each U.S. service member who died in Afghanistan or Iraq



    Al Qaeda Fighters Take Over Parts of Two Iraq Cities


    Al Qaeda fighters in a commandeered police truck pass burning police vehicles in front of the main provincial government building in Fallujah, Iraq, on Jan. 1, 2014. (Photo credit: The Associated Press)


    Photo Blog
    January 2, 2014

    Al Qaeda fighters brandished their weapons in the streets of two Iraqi cities and set police vehicles ablaze on Wednesday, The Associated Press reported. A provincial spokesman said the militants had taken over police stations and military posts in Fallujah and Ramadi after security forces left. …

    Full story

    Related: Al-Qaida-linked gunmen surge in two Iraq cities

    ———————————

    1/15/2014 Update

    Iraq Bomb Blasts Kill Dozens Amid Worst Violence in Five Years

    Video

    Deadly Bomb Attacks in Iraq (NBC News, Jan. 15, 2014) – Bomb attacks killed about 50 people in Baghdad and a village in the north of the country. (01:10)

    By F. Brinley Bruton

    January 15, 2014

    A slew of bomb attacks killed about 50 people in the Iraqi capital and a village in the north of the country on Wednesday, according to hospital and police sources cited by Reuters.

    In the deadliest incident, a bomb blew up mourners at a funeral for a pro-government Sunni Muslim militiamen who died two days ago, police said. It killed 18 people and wounded 16 in Shatub, a village south of Baquba, Reuters reported.

    Car bombs exploded across Baghdad, mostly in Shiite districts, killing 34 and wounding 71. …

    Two years after U.S. troops withdrew from Iraq, violence has reached levels seen in 2006 and 2007, when tens of thousands of people died.

    Full story

    ———————————

    1/20/2014 Update

    Bomb Blasts Kill 26 People in Baghdad

    By Ahmed Rasheed

    January 20, 2014

    BAGHDAD – Seven bomb explosions killed 26 people and wounded 67 in the Iraqi capital on Monday, police and medics said, as security forces battled Sunni Muslim militants around the western cities of Falluja and Ramadi.

    The bloodiest attack occurred in mainly Shi’ite Muslim Abu Dsheer district in southern Baghdad, where a car bomb near a crowded market killed seven people and wounded 18. …

    Al Qaeda militants and their local allies seized control of Falluja and parts of Ramadi on January 1, exploiting resentment among minority Sunnis against the government for policies perceived as unfairly penalizing their once-dominant community.

    Five of Monday’s bombs targeted mainly Shi’ite districts of the capital, while two were in mostly Sunni areas. …

    Full story

    ———————————

    1/25/2014 Update

    Iraqis Fleeing Anbar Fighting At Rates Not Seen Since Civil War


    Sunni Muslim families fleeing their homes in the city of Fallujah wait to enter the central Iraqi Shiite Muslim shrine city of Karbala. (Photo credit: Ahmad Al-Rubaye / AFP – Getty Images, file)

    By F. Brinley Bruton

    January 24, 2014

    Iraqis are fleeing fighting in the cities of Fallujah and Ramadi at rates not seen since that country’s civil war six years ago.

    In the past week alone, some 65,000 people have left the two cities in Anbar province, the site of fierce fighting between the Shiite-led government and al Qaeda-linked groups, U.N. refugee agency UNHCR said in a statement. …

    More than 140,000 have been made homeless since the violence broke out at the end of last year, which is on top of the 1.1 million already displaced within Iraq, it added. …

    Iraq has just been through its worst 12 months of violence in years, reaching levels not seen since it was emerging from its most turbulent post-invasion period between 2006 and 2008.

    In recent weeks, fighters opposed to the government have taken control of parts of the cities of Ramadi and Fallujah. On Sunday, government forces launched an all-out offensive to push back the fighters in Ramadi, officials said.

    On Monday, seven bombs hit the capital Baghdad, killing at least 26 people and wounding 67, officials told Reuters.

    Full story

    ———————————

    2/21/2014 Update

    Bomb Blasts in Iraq Kill 49, Injure 90


    February 18, 2014

    At least 49 people were killed as bombs rocked predominantly Shi’ite Muslim districts of the Iraqi capital and the southern city of Hilla on Tuesday, police and hospital sources said.

    The deadliest violence hit Hilla a small city around 60 miles south of Baghdad, where seven car bombs killed 35 people inside the city itself and in the nearby towns of Haswa, Mahaweel and Mussayab.

    “Hilla hospital has received 35 bodies so far from seven car bomb blasts,” said one health official. A further 90 people were wounded in the blasts. Fourteen more people were killed in explosions in mainly Shi’ite districts of Baghdad.

    In one of those, a bomb inside a parked vehicle exploded near a bus station in the Bayaa district, killing five people, the sources said. There were also blasts in the Amil, Ilam and Shurta districts. …
    Last year was Iraq’s bloodiest since sectarian bloodshed began to abate in 2008.

    Full story

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    3/6/2014 Update

    Series of Car Bombs Hits Baghdad, Killing 17


    Municipal workers clean the site of a bomb attack in Baghdad, Iraq, on Wednesday, March 5, 2014. (Photo credit: Ahmed Saad / Reuters)

    By Sinan Salaheddin

    March 5, 2014

    BAGHDAD (AP) — A series of car bombs hit commercial areas and marketplaces in mainly Shiite areas of Baghdad on Wednesday, killing at least 17 people, officials said.

    The bombings were the latest in a campaign by Sunni militants seeking to undermine the Shiite-led government’s efforts to maintain security across the country less than two months ahead of national elections.

    Violence has surged in Iraq since last year, with the country weathering its deadliest bout of violence since it pulled back from the brink of civil war in 2008. U.N. figures showed that last year, the country saw the highest death toll in attacks, with 8,868 people killed.

    On April 30, Iraq is to hold its first parliamentary elections since the U.S. troops’ withdrawal in late 2011.

    Wednesday’s attacks were all carried out by explosives-rigged cars parked in streets of the capital’s mainly Shiite areas. Two of the bombings rocked outdoor markets in the northern neighborhoods of Shaab and Shula, killing four civilians in each attack, police said. At least 31 others were wounded in these blasts.

    Three other civilians were killed and nine were wounded in a bombing in the southeastern district of Zafaraniyah, police officials said. In Baghdad’s southeastern Bayaa neighborhood, three civilians were killed and 11 wounded, while a bombing in the crowded commercial area of Karrada, killed two civilians and wounded 12. And in the eastern Sadr City neighborhood, one civilian was killed and three were wounded. …

    Such bombings have increased, along with Sunni anger over perceived mistreatment and random arrests of Sunnis by the authorities.

    Full story

    ————————————————

    Related reports on this site


    Iraq violence on Monday, Aug. 15, 2011 (Graphic: Reuters)

    Iraq Continues Post-Saddam Slide to Civil War — Part 1 (2012-2013)

    Bomb Attacks Targeting Iraqi Police Continue in Baghdad (Oct. 12, 2011)

    Coordinated Bombings in Baghdad Target Iraqi Police (Oct. 11, 2011)

    Insurgents Target Iraqi Soldiers, Police in Spate of Attacks (Sept. 14, 2011)

    Bloody Mayhem Across Iraq (Aug. 15, 2011)

    Baghdad Area Bombings Continue (July 5, 2011)

    Deadly Blasts Shatter Calm in Baghdad (June 23, 2011)

    Spate of Bombings in Baghdad (April 18, 2011)

    Iraq: Many Dead in Tikrit (March 29, 2011)

    Iraq: Slaughter in Samarra (Feb. 12, 2011)

    Iraq Violence Persists (Feb. 9, 2011)

    Christians Fleeing New Iraq (Jan. 20, 2011)

    Wholesale Slaughter in Iraq (Jan. 18, 2011)



    U.S. Military Deaths in Afghanistan

    As of Tuesday, December 31, 2013, at least 2,301 members of the U.S. military had died in Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Uzbekistan as a result of the invasion of Afghanistan in late 2001, according to iCasualties.org.

    Since the start of U.S. military operations in Afghanistan, 17,674 U.S. service members have been wounded as of Sept. 30, 2012, according to iCasualties.org.

    Latest identifications:


    Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Matthew R. Rodriguez, Fairhaven, Mass., died Dec. 11, 2013 while conducting combat operations in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, I Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Pendleton, Calif.


    Navy Petty Officer 1st Class James L. Smith, Huffman, Texas, died Dec. 11, 2013 in Landstuhl, Germany, from a noncombat-related incident. He was a construction mechanic assigned to Naval Mobile Construction Battalion 28, Shreveport, La.


    Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Randy L. Billings, 34, Heavener, Okla., died Dec. 17, 2013 in Now Bahar, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered as a result of a helicopter crash. He was assigned to the 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.


    Army Sgt. Peter C. Bohler, 29, Willow Spring, N.C., died Dec. 17, 2013 in Now Bahar, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered as a result of a helicopter crash. He was assigned to the 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.


    Army Sgt. 1st Class Omar W. Forde, 28, Marietta, Ga., died Dec. 17, 2013 in Now Bahar, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered as a result of a helicopter crash. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Company, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.


    Army Spc. Terry K. D. Gordon, 22, Shubuta, Miss., died Dec. 17, 2013 in Now Bahar, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered as a result of a helicopter crash. He was assigned to 1st Squadron, 6th Cavalry Regiment, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.


    Army Chief Warrant Officer 2 Joshua B. Silverman, 35, Scottsdale, Ariz., died Dec. 17, 2013 in Now Bahar, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered as a result of a helicopter crash. He was assigned to the 3rd Assault Helicopter Battalion, 1st Aviation Regiment, 1st Combat Aviation Brigade, 1st Infantry Division, Fort Riley, Kan.


    Army Staff Sgt. Jesse L. Williams, 30, Elkhart, Ind., died Dec. 17, 2013 in Now Bahar, Afghanistan, of injuries suffered as a result of a helicopter crash. He was assigned to Headquarters and Headquarters Troop, Regimental Support Squadron, 2nd Cavalry Regiment, Vilseck, Germany.


    Marine Corps Sgt. Daniel M. Vasselian, 27, Abington, Mass., died Dec. 23, 2013 in an ambush while conducting combat operations in Helmand province, Afghanistan. He was assigned to 1st Battalion, 9th Marine Regiment, 2nd Marine Division, II Marine Expeditionary Force, Camp Lejeune, N.C.


    Air Force Capt. David I. Lyon, 28, Sandpoint, Idaho, died Dec. 27, 2013 from wounds suffered when his vehicle was attacked with an improvised explosive device in Kabul, Afghanistan. He was assigned to the 21st Logistics Readiness Squadron, Peterson Air Force Base, Colo.

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Remember Their Sacrifice

    Related links

    Iraq Casualties

    Afghanistan Casualties

    Honor the Fallen

    Click to visit the Military Times Hall of Valor

    Visit Military Times — The top source for military news

    Faces of the Dead
    An interactive look at each U.S. service member who died in Afghanistan or Iraq



    Basketball Photo Gallery (2012-2013)

    Sartell Sabres senior power forward/center #41 Tim Immelman (6′7′′ 220 lbs)


    Click on photo for larger image

    YouTube: Sartell Sabres Basketball Channel


    Sartell basketball captain Tim Immelman raises the Minnesota Class 8AAA boys’ basketball trophy after scoring the winning basket in the section championship game against Fergus Falls at St. Cloud State University’s Halenbeck Hall, March 14, 2013. (Photo credit: Jack Hellie; click on photo for larger image)


    Sartell at Brainerd, Dec. 11, 2012.
    (Photo credit:
    Kelly Humphrey / Brainerd Dispatch)


    Sartell’s Tim Immelman (41) puts the ball in to score over Rocori’s Zach Schneider, Jan. 8, 2013. (Photo: Jason Wachter / St. Cloud Times)


    Tim Immelman’s winning shot in the Minnesota Class 8AAA boys’ basketball championship game against Fergus Falls at St. Cloud State University’s Halenbeck Hall, March 14, 2013.


    Sartell basketball captains Tim Immelman, Patrick Fischer, and Parker Hagen hold the Minnesota Class 8AAA boys’ basketball trophy after beating Fergus Falls in the section championship game at St. Cloud State University’s Halenbeck Hall, March 14, 2013. (Photo credit: Jack Hellie; click on photo for larger image)


    Sartell Sabres boys’ basketball send-off to the 2013 Minnesota state tournament; captains’ interviews and sectional championship buzzer-beater as reported on KSNI.


    Tim Immelman, senior and captain, takes the opening tip-off against Reid Travis of the DeLaSalle Islanders during the Sartell Sabres’ first-ever state championship competition [report]. (Photo credit: Jack Hellie / Sartell Newsleader)


    Tim Immelman (41) scores over Reid Travis (22) in the Class 3A quarterfinal game Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at the University of Minnesota’s Williams Arena in Minneapolis. (Photo credit: Chad Gessell; click on photo for larger image)


    Sartell-St. Stephen’s Tim Immelman (41) goes up to block DeLaSalle’s Reid Travis’ (22) layup in the first half of the Class 3A quarterfinal game Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at the University of Minnesota’s Williams Arena in Minneapolis. (Photo credit: Bre McGee, Special to the St. Cloud Times)


    Tim Immelman swats a Reid Travis dunk attempt at the Minnesota Class 3A State Basketball Tournament at the University of Minnesota’s Williams Arena, March 20, 2013.


    Sartell-St. Stephen’s Tim Immelman (41) sets a pick for teammate Patrick Fischer (25) against DeLaSalle’s Sacar Anim (15) in the first half of the Class 3A quarterfinal game Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at the University of Minnesota’s Williams Arena in Minneapolis. (Photo credit: Bre McGee, Special to the St. Cloud Times; click on photo for larger image)


    Sartell-St. Stephen’s Tim Immelman (41) looks to block the shot of DeLaSalle’s Reid Travis (22) towards the end of the first half of the Class 3A quarterfinal game Wednesday, March 20, 2013 at the University of Minnesota’s Williams Arena in Minneapolis. (Photo credit: Bre McGee, Special to the St. Cloud Times)


    Tim Immelman state tournament highlight video

    ——————————————————

    2012-13 Season Video Playlist

    Sartell Sabres Boys Varsity

    Central Lakes Conference — All Conference Boys Basketball 2012-13

    16-0 Brainerd: Marcus Comstock, Jack Sauer, Jacob Blong
    9-7 Sartell: Pat Fischer, Tom Bearson, Tim Immelman
    9-7 Fergus Falls: Mike Millard, Austin Rund
    9-7 Apollo: Brett Maslonkowski, Isaac Rakke
    9-7 Rocori: Jonah Eisenschenk, Mac Mueller
    7-9 Alexandria: Logan Doyle, John Vogeler
    7-9 Willmar: Austin Rambow
    5-11 Tech: Andy Foley
    1-15 Sauk Rapids: None

    Tim Immelman — High School Career Achievements

    • Central Lakes All-Conference team (2011-12, 2012-13)
    • School record-holder for single-season 2-point field goal percentage (167/263 — 63.5% –  2011-12); also holds 4th place overall in Sartell school history for single-season 2-point field goal percentage (142/234 — 60.7% — 2012-13) and 2nd place overall in Sartell school history for career 2-point field goal percentage (373/636 — 58.6% — 2009-13)
    • 5th place overall in Sartell school history for number of career 2-point field goals made (373/636 — 58.6% — 2009-13); also holds 5th and 9th place overall in number of single-season 2-point field goals made (167, 2011-12; 142, 2012-13)
    • 2nd place overall in Sartell school history for number of career blocked shots (70, 2009-13); also holds 3rd and 6th place overall in number of single-season blocked shots (29, 2012-13; 25, 2011-12)
    • 7th place overall in Sartell school history for number of career rebounds (415, 2009-13); 16th place overall in number of single-season rebounds by any player in Sartell school history (171,  2012-13); top rebounder junior and senior seasons (143, 2011-12 ; 171, 2012-13)
    • 8th place overall in Sartell school history for career individual total points (857, 2009-13)
    • 6th place overall in Sartell school history for career games played (90, 2009-13)
    • 17th place overall in Sartell school history for most points scored by any player in a single season (373, 2011-12)
    • Leading scorer for Sartell as a junior (373 points in 803 minutes played in 28 games; 13.3 points/game)
    • Three-year starter, two-year captain for the Sartell Sabres
    • Helped lead Sartell to the state tournament for the first time in 44 years of school basketball history.


    The Sartell Sabres boys’ basketball team with the 2013 Minnesota Class 8AAA trophy after beating the Fergus Falls Otters 57-55 in the section championship game at Saint Cloud State University’s Halenbeck Hall, March 14, 2013. (Photo credit: Jack Hellie)

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    Related reports on this site

    Sartell Wins Breakdown USA Basketball Summer Showcase (June 25, 2012)


    Flanked by Greg Bearson (L) and Dave Fischer (R), Sartell Sabres (from left to right) Dylan Hollenkamp (6-0 SF), Patrick Fischer (6-4 PG), Ben Lanners (6-7 F), Tom Bearson (6-0 SG), Tim Immelman (6-7 PF/C), and Parker Hagen (6-3 F). (Photo: Aubrey Immelman)

    Tim Immelman — 2011-12 Basketball Photo Gallery (April 22, 2012)


    Sartell junior Tim Immelman (#21) shoots over Alexandria junior Logan Doyle, Dec. 13, 2011. (Photo credit: Randy Housey; click on photo for larger image)



    A Formula for the Fall of Apartheid

    Many factors combined to create a ‘perfect storm’


    F. W. de Klerk and Nelson Mandela (Image: Public Domain)

    By Aubrey Immelman
    St. Cloud Times
    December 15, 2013

    Watching TV talking heads in the wake of Nelson Mandela’s passing, I could easily have been fooled into believing the former South African president would still be sitting behind bars on Robben Island, but for the efforts of these heroic politicians and assorted Reagan-era anti-apartheid activists.

    I say “could,” because I knew better than to fall for facile explanations of South Africa’s transition from apartheid state to nonracial democracy.

    That’s because I was blessed — or cursed — with the opportunity to observe the transition from a dual vantage point inside the regime: as a regional youth chair of the leading anti-apartheid opposition party working to effect change from within; and as a foot soldier in the apartheid government’s military pitted against Mandela’s guerrilla fighters in the armed struggle to topple the regime by force.

    Factors accounting for change

    So what exactly was it that caused apartheid to crumble? As is usually the case with complex historical events, a host of factors combined to form the “perfect storm” to end apartheid.

    The most important elements were these:

    Externally — the collapse of the former Soviet Union, the successful transition to majority rule in neighboring Namibia, and international sanctions against South Africa, including cultural isolation and economic divestment.

    Internally — the liberation struggle, white opposition to apartheid, the failure of apartheid, moderation of the leadership in the ruling National Party, the breakdown of National Party hegemony and, finally, the personal role of the two leading players — Nelson Mandela and F. W. de Klerk, joint recipients of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1993.

    » Collapse of communism: The 1989-91 collapse of communist governments in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union — for many years the major sponsors of Mandela’s African National Congress — provided a strong incentive for the ANC to forgo the armed struggle in favor of seeking a negotiated settlement with the National Party government.

    » Namibia’s transition to majority rule: Namibia, administered by South Africa since 1920 under a League of Nations mandate, gained independence in 1990 after protracted negotiations between the South African government and the black majority, ending a two-decades-long insurgency war. The peaceful transition played a significant role in allaying the fears of white South Africans with regard to power sharing.

    » International sanctions: Coinciding with changes in Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union, punitive economic sanctions imposed by the international community were slowly sapping the South African economy, exerting pressure on the government to negotiate with (rather than fight) the ANC.

    » The liberation struggle: Against the background of increasing economic and cultural isolation, the liberation struggle in South Africa drastically intensified during the mid-1980s. Internal resistance to apartheid took many forms, including consumer boycotts of white-owned businesses, rent boycotts in the black townships, nationwide strikes, and other forms of mass action designed to make the country ungovernable.

    » Sustained pressure by the moderate white opposition: Though constituting a tiny minority in Parliament, the anti-apartheid opposition played an influential role in South African politics in the decade leading up to Mandela’s release from prison, garnering the support of up to 25 percent of white voters favoring its platform of a negotiated settlement with the black majority and universal franchise, popularly referred to as “One Man, One Vote.”

    » The failure of apartheid: A frequently ignored factor in the demise of structural apartheid is that its very fabric primed it for self-destruction in a modern world. Just as the feudal system in Europe succumbed to the modern nation state, apartheid as conceptualized by its architects in the 1950s and ‘60s became a political dinosaur. The apartheid system simply could not be sustained in a modern, industrialized, global economy.

    » Moderation of the National Party leadership: By the 1970s the writing already was on the wall for apartheid, as the ruling National Party haltingly began to liberalize its policies. As a consequence of these accommodations, the ruling party’s right wing split off twice — in 1969 and again in 1982 — to form more conservative, “ideologically pure” opposition movements. An important implication of this realignment is that the ideological center in the National Party shifted to the left, creating new opportunities for the emergence of moderate leaders like de Klerk.

    » The breakdown of National Party hegemony: Relentless international sanctions and isolation, the breakdown of apartheid policies, internal opposition, and the weakening of the old National Party with defections to the right and left all contributed to a breakdown of four decades of National Party hegemony.

    And with Soviet communism consigned to the dustbin of history, the climate was ripe for a new world order.

    As the 1980s drew to a close, the stage was set. What remained was for an event-making, forward-looking, conciliatory leader to step up to the plate. F. W. de Klerk was to be that man, with Nelson Mandela waiting in the wings.

    ———

    Note

    An unabridged version of this article, including an overview of South Africa’s political history, a summary of apartheid legislation, and psychological profiles of South African presidents P.W. Botha, F.W. de Klerk, and Nelson Mandela, is available at the link below.

    Immelman, A. (1994). South Africa’s Long March to Freedom: A Personal View. The Saint John’s Symposium, 12, 1-20.

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    Related reports on this site

    Nelson Mandela at 93 (July 18, 2011)

    Passing of a Visionary Leader (May 16, 2010)

    Farewell to a Hero (Jan. 2, 2009)