Current Events and the Psychology of Politics
Loading

Featured Posts        



categories        



Links        



archives        



meta        




Apr 22nd, 2019




The Ingraham Angle on Fox News (March 20, 2019)


“Ingraham to Trump: You’ve stepped on your own message by focusing on McCain, Conway” — There’s too much left to be done to waste a moment on score settling, the host of ‘The Ingraham Angle’ says. (2:20)

Months after John McCain’s death, Trump keeps feud with him alive (Maggie Haberman, Annie Karni, and Michael Tackett, New York Times, March 21, 2019) — The president said he gave the Arizona senator “the funeral he wanted, and I didn’t get ‘thank you,’” escalating attacks on Mr. McCain that began over the weekend. …


Photo credit: The Hill


Related report on this site

In Memory of Sen. John McCain (1936-2018) (Aug. 25, 2018)



Obituary



As reported in the New York Times (March 8, 2019), the collapse of the Feb. 27-28 Hanoi summit meeting with U.S. President Donald Trump “was considered a big embarrassment” for North Korean leader Kim Jong-un “because he had to return home empty-handed after Mr. Trump rejected his demand for relief from United Nations sanctions.”

Satellite imagery indicating North Korea has begun to rebuild the Sohae Satellite Launching Station at Tongchang-ri has raised fears among some analysts that the country might resume missile tests (New York Times, March 5, 2019).

Sohae Satellite Launching Station, March 6, 2019 (Credit: Pleiades © CNES 2019, Distribution Airbus Defence & Space via 38 North)

The U.S. response to these developments is critical to the progress of denuclearization talks with North Korea. In that regard, it is noteworthy that DPRK state media adopted a conciliatory tone, expressing the hope that “the whole world sincerely hopes that the peace process on the Korean Peninsula will proceed smoothly and the North Korea-United States relations will improve soon” (Rodong Sinmun, March 8, 2019).

The New York Times notes that the DPRK “has shied away from using harsh language against the United States or Mr. Trump” and that by “only indirectly blaming Washington for the failure and voicing hopes for better ties,” the Rodong Sinmun commentary “appeared to signal a willingness to keep diplomacy alive with the United States.”

That perspective suggests a path forward for the U.S., considering the political psychology of Kim Jong-un:

Chairman Kim is cooperative, willing to compromise or make concessions to resolve differences; however, he is also confident, competitive, and assertive and expects others to recognize his capabilities. As a dominant, controlling leader, he demands respect and can be tough and unsentimental in asserting himself. Finally, as an outgoing, expressive personality, he is not averse to employing dramatic, attention‑getting maneuvers to signal intent or to achieve his political objectives.

Thus, for President Trump, this is not the time to employ coercive diplomacy by reverting to “maximum pressure,” personal affronts to Chairman Kim’s dignity, or otherwise signaling hostile intent. Instead, the president should stay the course by continuing to emphasize his special relationship with Kim to accommodate his need for self-validation and permit him to save face as his nation’s supreme leader in the aftermath of the failed Hanoi summit.

In response to signals from North Korea on the resumption of rocket testing and satellite- or missile launches, there are three political-psychological inflection points for targeting resistance and gaining compliance:

  • President Trump should guard against manipulative behavior by the DPRK designed to secure short-term payoffs.
  • President Trump should be aware of and preempt Chairman Kim’s predisposition to terminate the negotiation partnership upon
    realizing the structural constraints on the ability of the president to make concessions or offer assistance.
  • President Trump should deescalate the situation by reaffirming the strength of the negotiation partnership.

——————————————

March 14, 2019 Update

North Korea’s Sohae Satellite Launch Facility: No new activity since March 8 (Jack Liu, Peter Makowsky, and Jenny Town, 38 North, March 13, 2019) — Recent commercial satellite imagery of the Sohae Satellite Launching Station (Tongchang-ri) shows no changes to the launch pad or engine test stand between March 8 and March 13. … Full report

——————————————

March 16, 2019 Update

The U.S. and North Korea are back to talking tough (Uri Friedman, The Atlantic, March 16, 2019) — The attack dogs have been let loose. That much was clear from the stark message North Korea delivered this week after the collapse of Donald Trump’s summit with Kim Jong Un in Vietnam last month: Kim is considering abandoning nuclear negotiations with the United States and resuming the nuclear and missile tests that brought the two countries to the brink of war early on in the Trump administration. … The unmuzzling of the attack dogs on each side is a reminder that Trump and Kim are each contending with a hard-line faction at home that views the diplomacy they’re engaged in as a hopeless and dangerous endeavor. As [North Korea’s vice foreign minister, Choe Son Hui] noted this week, Kim decided to press ahead with diplomacy in Vietnam despite the fact that military leaders are petitioning him not to give up his nuclear program. … Full report

——————————————

March 22, 2019 Update

CNN-Politics_The-Point

March 22, 2018

FOREIGN POLICY BY TWEET

 

President Donald Trump’s early afternoon tweet sent the international community scrambling.

Trump tweeted the administration would withdraw additional sanctions against North Korea … even though those additional sanctions had just been announced by his own administration.

The White House declined to give details on the sudden policy shift, but said Trump was pulling back newly issued sanctions because he “likes” North Korea’s leader Kim Jong Un, according to CNN’s Jeremy Diamond and Kylie Atwood.

It was not immediately clear which sanctions Trump was referring to in his tweet. But just 24 hours earlier, the Treasury Department announced sanctions targeting two Chinese shipping companies that have allegedly helped North Korea skirt sanctions imposed by the United Nations.


Topical report

The Personality Profile of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un

ISPP-2018_Kim-Jong-Un_poster
Click on image for larger view



U.S. President Donald Trump’s second summit with North Korea’s Chairman Kim Jong-un in Hanoi, Vietnam on February 27-28 ended prematurely when talks broke down without a deal after Kim insisted the U.S. lift all sanctions on his country. “Sometimes you have to walk,” the president said in a news conference.

President Donald Trump and Chairman Kim Jong-un sit down to take a few questions from the press before dinner on February 27, 2019. (Photo: Saul Loeb / AFP / Getty Images via CNN)

Click for CNN’s latest updates and analysis and pictures from the summit.

—————————————

March 3, 2019 Update

How the Trump-Kim Summit Failed: Big Threats, Big Egos, Bad Bets


President Trump and the North Korean leader, Kim Jong-un, in Hanoi. “A proposal to go big’’ fell short. (Photo credit: Doug Mills / The New York Times)

By David E. Sanger and Edward Wong

March 2, 2019

Excerpts

Mr. Kim had resisted what Mr. Trump presented as a grand bargain: North Korea would trade all its nuclear weapons, material and facilities for an end to the American-led sanctions squeezing its economy.

An American official later described this as “a proposal to go big,” a bet by Mr. Trump that his force of personality, and view of himself as a consummate dealmaker, would succeed where three previous presidents had failed.

But Mr. Trump’s offer was essentially the same deal that the United States has pushed — and the North has rejected — for a quarter century. Intelligence agencies had warned him, publicly, Mr. Kim would not be willing to give up the arsenal completely. North Korea itself had said repeatedly that it would only move gradually.

Several of Mr. Trump’s own aides, led by national security adviser John R. Bolton and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, thought the chances of a grand bargain for total nuclear disarmament were virtually zero. Some questioned whether the summit meeting should go forward. …

Mr. Kim also miscalculated. He bet Mr. Trump might accept a more modest offer that American negotiators in Hanoi had already dismissed: The North would dismantle the Yongbyon nuclear complex, three square miles of aging facilities at the heart of the nuclear program, for an end to the sanctions most harmful to its economy, those enacted since 2016. …

But Mr. Pompeo, who knew the details of the North Korean program intimately from his days as C.I.A. director, opposed it. The president was told that if he settled for Yongbyon alone, he might appear to have been duped by the young leader of a country renowned for hiding pieces of its nuclear program in tunnels around the country.

Mr. Pompeo said later that Mr. Kim’s offer “still leaves missiles, still leaves warheads and weapons systems” — and a senior State Department official argued that sanctions relief would fund the production of more weapons.

It also would have let the North continue to produce uranium, a key ingredient for nuclear weapons, at a hidden enrichment center near the capital, Pyongyang — one of several suspected nuclear sites beyond Yongbyon that the United States has been monitoring from afar for nearly a decade. …

But soon after the two men arrived at the Metropole, the North Korean leader began arguing for relief from the five rounds of sanctions in exchange for Yongbyon.

While North Korea had suspended operations at Yongbyon under agreements in 1994 and again in 2007, and later offered various moratoriums that were never fully executed, Mr. Kim’s proposal appeared to go further than ever toward dismantling the entirety of the complex, officials said. But the exact terms were still vague.

Mr. Trump countered with the grand bargain. The divide was underscored by the fact that, at one point, he presented Mr. Kim with a document laying out his definition of denuclearization.

Mr. Kim objected that there was not enough trust between the two countries to give up everything at once. …

 


 

Related interest: Kim Jong-un PowerPoint presentation

DPRK-USA_Hanoi-Summit-billboard

On February 27-28, 2019, U.S. president Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un held a second summit meeting in Hanoi, Vietnam.

PowerPoint presentation: Kim Jong Un Psychological Profile

Personality-Dynamics


 

Related interest: Research reports

The Leadership Style of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict, Collegeville and St. Joseph, Minn., June 10, 2018. Abstract and link for full-text (17 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: https://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/120/

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/

The Personality Profile of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict, Collegeville and St. Joseph, Minn., April 1, 2018. Abstract and link for full-text (32 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: https://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/119/

The Political Personality of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

 


Topical reports on this site

The Personality Profile of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un

ISPP-2018_Kim-Jong-Un_poster
Click on image for larger view

President Donald Trump to Meet North Korea’s Kim Jong-un

Combination photo of North Korean leader Kim Jong Un and U.S. President Donald Trump

“He’s got a great personality. He’s a funny guy, he’s very smart, he’s a great negotiator.”

— President Donald Trump, on North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, June 12, 2018.



In an op-ed published in the Washington Post (Jan. 1, 2019) Mitt Romney, newly elected Republican senator from Utah, wrote: “[O]n balance, [Donald Trump’s] conduct over the past two years … is evidence that the president has not risen to the mantle of the office,” adding, “A president should demonstrate the essential qualities of honesty and integrity, and elevate the national discourse with comity and mutual respect.”

Although one can only speculate on Romney’s rationale for this highly unusual maneuver — assailing the character of the president, no less the leader of his own party — the senator-elect’s personality profile offers a partial glimpse into his underlying motives.

Specifically, Romney’s primary personality pattern — conscientiousness — is characterized by deep-seated resonance to the personal qualities of honesty, integrity, and respect — suggesting it is no accident that Romney zeroed in on those particular traits as lacking in the president (and, by implication, holding himself up as exemplifying those qualities).

Romney poster (2013)
Click on image for larger view

More » The Political Personality of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney. Paper presented at the 35th Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, Chicago, July 6–9, 2012. Abstract and link for full-text (35 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/98/

—————————————
April 19, 2019 Update

Romney on Mueller report: I am ‘sickened’ by ‘dishonesty and misdirection’ of President Trump

By Jamie Ehrlich

April 19, 2019

Republican Sen. Mitt Romney issued a sharp rebuke of President Donald Trump on Friday following the release of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report, saying he was “sickened” by details in revealed in the document.

“I am sickened at the extent and pervasiveness of dishonesty and misdirection by individuals in the highest office of the land, including the President. I am also appalled that, among other things, fellow citizens working in a campaign for president welcomed help from Russia,” the Utah Republican said in a statement.

As Senate Democrats begin to call for Trump’s impeachment based on Mueller’s evidence, Romney is one of the first Republican senators to sharply rebuke the actions outlined in the report. Romney has historically been one of the harshest Republican critics of the President.

“Reading the report is a sobering revelation of how far we have strayed from the aspirations and principles of the founders,” Romney said.

 


Related reports on this site

Mitt Romney Announces Bid for U.S. Senate in Utah (Feb. 17, 2018)

Mitt Romney for Secretary of State? (Nov. 19, 2016)

Mitt Romney’s Personality Profile (June 2, 2011)


As shown in the pie chart, Romney has a primarily Conscientious-dutiful personality, complemented by secondary Dominant-asserting, Ambitious-confident, and Accommodating-cooperative features and a minor Retiring-reserved tendency.

Mitt Romney’s Leadership Style (Sept. 3, 2012)


Research assistants Amanda Nusbaum and Feiran Chen presented their research on “The Personality Profile of 2012 Republican Presidential Candidate Mitt Romney” at the College of St. Benedict in St. Joseph, Minn., July 30, 2012.

Why Mitt Romney Won’t Be President — In Theory (Oct. 29, 2012)


Aubrey Immelman and Andrew Obritsch in Chicago at the annual scientific meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology to present their research on Barack Obama and Mitt Romney, July 2012.



A psychological analysis of United States Supreme Court associate justice Brett Kavanaugh by Allison Roehl and Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, revealed that Kavanaugh’s primary personality patterns are Conscientious/respectful and Accommodating/cooperative, with secondary Dominant/asserting and Ambitious/confident features. In summary, Justice Kavanaugh’s personality composite can be characterized as that of a conscientious conciliator.

Kavanaugh_poster
Click on image for larger view

Conscientious (scale 6) individuals are characteristically principled, prudent, proper, dignified, and dependable; they are dutiful and diligent, with a strong work ethic and careful attention to detail. Accommodating (scale 4) individuals are cordial, cooperative, and amicable; they are polite, respectful, and agreeable, willing to adapt their preferences to reconcile differences, and to concede or compromise when necessary. Dominant (scale 1A) individuals enjoy the power to direct others and to evoke obedience and respect; they can be tough and unsentimental and often are effective in positions of authority. Ambitious (scale 2) individuals are bold, competitive, and self-assured; they easily assume leadership roles, expect others to recognize their special qualities, and may act as though entitled.

The Conscientious–Accommodating (Scale 6–4) composite pattern

Individuals with a predominantly Conscientious (scale 6) personality pattern who also possess significant Accommodating (scale 4) features may be characterized as conscientious conciliators. The Conscientious–Accommodating blend is the most well-adjusted of all Conscientious personality variants. These personalities are earnest, hardworking, meticulous, play by the rules, and are duty-bound. The most prevalent limitation of this personality amalgam is a tendency to be inflexible and indecisive, with an unwarranted fear of failure or error; hence, they tend to be risk-averse and are typically more submissive (socially agreeable) than dominant.

Formulation

This indirect, at-a-distance personality assessment cannot be construed as disconfirming or confirming the sexual assault allegations dating back decades that Dr. Christine Blasey Ford leveled against Justice Brett Kavanaugh during his Senate confirmation hearings; those allegations must be evaluated on their own merits. It may, however, legitimately be asserted that the personality profile is inconsistent with that of a person who would exhibit a pattern of sexual misconduct (or any kind of habitual criminal or antisocial behavior). Finally, the profile cannot exclude the possibility that a teenage Brett Kavanaugh — irrespective of his enduring personality pattern — could have committed a sexual indiscretion on occasion when his judgment was impaired by alcohol intoxication.

Allison Roehl presents her poster, "The Personality Profile of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh," at the annual Department of Psychology Poster Session, College of St. Benedict | St. John's University, Dec. 4, 2018.
Allison Roehl presents her research poster, “The Personality Profile of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh,” at the annual Department of Psychology Poster Session, College of St. Benedict | St. John’s University, Dec. 4, 2018.


 

PowerPoint presentation

The Personality Profile of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh

Kavanaugh_PowerPoint-thumbnail

 


Related reports on this site

Christine Blasey Ford’s Sexual Assault Allegation Against Supreme Court Nominee Brett Kavanaugh (Sept. 27, 2018)

The expert witness best qualified to comment on the accuracy and reliability of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s memory of a sexual assault approximately 36 years ago is Dr. Elizabeth Loftus, distinguished professor in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior and the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at the University of California, Irvine, with additional appointments in the university’s Department of Cognitive Sciences and the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

Elizabeth-Loftus

“The real question in this case … is not whether this happened so much. But who actually did it. Because everything I’ve seen in the discussions of this case, one of the things I want to know is when did she attach the name Brett Kavanaugh to the episode that she is recounting from when she was 15 years old. And I wish somebody would ask that question because I think the answer to that question is pretty crucial.”

– Elizabeth Loftus (“Anderson Cooper 360°,” CNN, September 19, 2018)

The Personality Profile of United States Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas (Jan. 30, 2017)

More than a decade after the study was conducted, the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics has publicly released its personality profile of U.S. Supreme Court associate justice Clarence Thomas. The report was prepared for the Washington Post’s Kevin Merida as part of the background research for his book, with Michael Fletcher, Supreme Discomfort: The Divided Soul of Clarence Thomas (2007).

Clarence-Thomas_Supreme-Discomfort Immelman-quote_Clarence-Thomas_Supreme-Discomfort_p-5

The Personality of U.S. Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas. Research report, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, July 2004. Abstract and link for full-text (22 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/108/



President George Herbert Walker Bush dead at 94

George-H-W-Bush

Obituary

George H. W. Bush, President of the United States, 1989 official portrait cropped(b).jpg

 


Related: God Bless Bob Dole

Bob-Dole_salute_2018-12-04
Former U.S. Sen. Bob Dole, age 95, is helped out of his wheelchair to stand and salute the casket of former President George H. W. Bush in the U.S. Capitol Rotunda in Washington D.C., Tuesday, Dec. 4, 2018. (Due to his war injuries, Sen. Dole is physically unable to give a right-handed salute.)


 

References to George H. W. Bush on this site

At the time of George H. W. Bush’s election as president in 1988, I was a graduate student at the University of Maine, still in the early stages of developing my political psychology personality profiling methods. Hence, there few references to President Bush 41 on this site, based purely on informal observation; my first empirical study of a U.S. president dealt with Bill Clinton.

Position Statement on National Security (July 23, 2008)

Hagel-Immelman_09-23-2009
Sen. Chuck Hagel and Aubrey Immelman

Prior to the invasion [of Iraq in 2003], we had in place a very successful containment policy against Iraqi aggression, instituted by the first President Bush after the first Gulf War. By keeping Saddam Hussein in power, in concert with a vigorous weapons inspection regime and enforcement of no-fly zones, President George H. W. Bush preserved a delicate balance of power between Iran and Iraq in one of the world’s most volatile regions, the Middle East. …

Jeb Bush’s Personality Profile (Aug. 2, 2015)

Bush poster (July 2015)
Click on image for larger view

It isn’t always easy being the son and brother of past presidents. Ask Jeb Bush.

In June, former Florida Gov. John Ellis Bush, who goes by the nickname Jeb, formally announced his presidential run. Being a member of arguably the most prominent political dynasty in American history undoubtedly has its advantages. However, Jeb Bush must also confront the daunting task of differentiating himself from his father, George H. W. Bush, and distancing himself from some of the less admirable aspects of his older brother George W. Bush’s legacy — most notably the invasion of Iraq. …

[Jeb Bush] completed college in two and a half years, is a self-proclaimed policy wonk, and prides himself in working 12–16 hours per day. These attributes reflect his highly conscientiousness personality — similar to the Bush patriarch but in stark contrast to his older brother, who scored quite low on this personality trait. …

Donald Trump’s Leadership Style (Jan. 23, 2017)

Trump poster (2016)
Click on image for larger view

As a “high-dominance charismatic” [Donald] Trump assumes the mantle of leadership with a Clintonian combination of extraversion and self-confidence, buttressed by a level of dominance not seen since Lyndon B. Johnson. In addition, he is practically devoid of his predecessor’s [Barack Obama’s] accommodating disposition … or George H. W. Bush’s prudent conscientiousness. …



The expert witness best qualified to comment on the accuracy and reliability of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s memory of a sexual assault approximately 36 years ago is Dr. Elizabeth Loftus, distinguished professor in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior and the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at the University of California, Irvine, with additional appointments in the university’s Department of Cognitive Sciences and the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

Elizabeth-Loftus

“The real question in this case … is not whether this happened so much. But who actually did it. Because everything I’ve seen in the discussions of this case, one of the things I want to know is when did she attach the name Brett Kavanaugh to the episode that she is recounting from when she was 15 years old. And I wish somebody would ask that question because I think the answer to that question is pretty crucial.”

— Elizabeth Loftus (“Anderson Cooper 360°,” CNN, September 19, 2018)

Eminent California professor and human memory expert weighs in on Christine Ford’s allegations against Kavanaugh (Scott Morefield, Townhall.com, Sept. 23, 2018)

Caution, the Kavanaugh mess may never be resolved satisfactorily (Megan McArdle, Washington Post, Sept. 17, 2018)

Kavanaugh’s accuser may be telling the truth, but there are still big problems with her story (John Ziegler, Mediaite, Sept. 17, 2018)

More » Google search: Christine Blasey Ford Kavanaugh Elizabeth Loftus


Related interest

Recovered Memory of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Collegeville and St. Joseph, MN: St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict. (Originally published in St. Cloud Unabridged, Sept. 1994, pp. 2-4.) Retrieved from Digital Commons website: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/114/

Abstract: Examines the psychological basis for repression and recovery of traumatic memories, presents the results of research on potential sources of error in delayed or recovered memories, and offers possible reasons (primarily related to clinical practice and collective behavior) for false accusations of sexual abuse.



Sen. John McCain dead at 81

Obituary

Articles about John McCain by USPP contributors

Former POW McCain’s rise in polls leads to more scrutiny” (Melisa S. Illies and Aubrey Immelman, St. Cloud Times, Nov. 28, 1999, p. 11B) — In the first of our College of St. Benedict/St. John’s University presidential candidate profiles (St. Cloud Times, Nov. 7), Stephanie Anderson and Holly Berreau commented on Elizabeth Dole’s withdrawal from the 2000 presidential race. It was inevitable that Dole’s departure would prompt more intense public scrutiny of Arizona Sen. John McCain as the now unrivaled challenger for Texas Gov. George W. Bush’s front-runner status in the bid for the Republican nomination. Unfortunately for McCain, his newfound ascent to prominence has been troubled by turbulence. At issue: persistent reports in the media of a “volcanic temper,” casting doubt on his fitness to govern. … Full report

Heroism, timing help McCain’s campaign” (Matthew J. Tinguely and Aubrey Immelman, St. Cloud Times, March 5, 2000, p. 9B) — Despite the overwhelming support of elected Republican leaders and the Republican establishment for the candidacy of George W. Bush, the insurgent John McCain catapulted into the national spotlight with primary wins in New Hampshire, Michigan, and Arizona. Polls released last week show McCain running well ahead of Bush in a hypothetical two-way race against likely Democratic nominee Al Gore. … What drives the McCain political machine? Two words: “hero” and “personality.” … Full report

Maverick McCain finds his mojo — But what does it mean?” (Patrick Sweetman and Aubrey Immelman, St. Cloud Times, Jan. 10, 2008, p. 7B) — John McCain’s victory in Tuesday’s New Hampshire Republican primary has injected new life in a presidential campaign some had all but given up for dead. With recent polls showing McCain to be the Republican contender best positioned to beat the Democratic nominee in November, the resuscitation of McCain’s presidential prospects in New Hampshire raises anew the question of how he might govern as leader of the free world. … Full report

McCain’s maverick nature is double-edged sword” (Amy Marschall and Aubrey Immelman, St. Cloud Times, Oct. 15, 2008, p. 7B) — As the 2008 presidential campaign enters the home stretch in a time of growing economic uncertainty, voters are taking a new look at John McCain, who clinched the Republican nomination largely on the basis of his military and foreign policy credentials in a time of war. … To obtain a more precise reading of the real McCain, we consulted four personality profiles of the Arizona senator, developed at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics at the College of St. Benedict and St. John’s University in 1999, 2007, and the spring and summer of 2008. Collectively, the profiles reveal a highly dominant individual with a dauntless, dissenting, adventurous streak and a strong outgoing tendency. … Full report

John McCain: A question of temperament” (Aubrey Immelman St. Cloud Times, Nov. 1, 2008, p. 7B) — As Arizona Sen. John McCain tries to close the gap with Barack Obama in the final weekend leading up to Tuesday’s presidential election, his task is to convince the American people that he’s the right man to lead the nation at a time when America faces daunting economic challenges at home and urgent national security threats abroad. Voters, for their part, must discern whether McCain has the right stuff to move the nation in the right direction. A useful metric to take a measure of the man is temperament — that is, McCain’s mental and emotional predisposition to action. … Full report

The Political Personality of 2008 Republican Presidential Nominee John McCain. Research report, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, September 2008. Abstract and link for full-text (26 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/115/

 


Related report on this site

The Political Personalities of 2008 Presidential Candidates Barack Obama and John McCain (Nov. 2, 2008)


Click on image for larger view



Psychological Profiles of World Leaders at ISPP 2018 Annual Meeting

U.S. President Donald Trump

ISPP-2018_Presentation-1
Aubrey Immelman presents his paper on “The political personality of 2016 Republican presidential nominee Donald J. Trump” at the 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Antonio, Texas, July 4-7, 2018.

ISPP-2018_Immelman
Aubrey Immelman explains his conceptual model for the indirect assessment of personality in politics at the 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Antonio, Texas, July 4-7, 2018.

Russian President Vladimir Putin

ISPP-2018_DeLandtsheer-Diedkova
Christ’l De Landtsheer, director of the Political Communication Research Unit at the University of Antwerp, Belgium, introduces her doctoral student Ganna Diedkova’s study on “The value of electability in a hybrid regime: Comparing personality profiles of Russian president Vladimir Putin and his opponent Alexei Navalny” at the 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Antonio, Texas, July 4-7, 2018.

ISPP-2018_Diedkova-3
Ganna Diedkova presents the results of her research, with Christ’l De Landtsheer, on “The value of electability in a hybrid regime: Comparing personality profiles of Russian president Vladimir Putin and his opponent Alexei Navalny” at the 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Antonio, Texas, July 4-7, 2018.

Findings of the psychodiagnostic meta-analysis for Vladimir Putin

  • Prominence of the Dominant pattern (13 points; gradation b)
  • Presence of Conscientious and Ambitious patterns (9 points each; gradation a)
  • Evidence of Distrusting personality pattern (17 points)

Diedkova - Putin profile

China’s President Xi Jinping

ISPP-2018_Dekleva
Kenneth Dekleva, M.D., University of Texas Southwest Medical Center, presents his research on “The child is father to the man: A political psychology profile of China’s Xi Jinping” at the 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Antonio, Texas, July 4-7, 2018.

View related presentation: “The Child is Father to the Man: A Political Psychology Profile of China’s Xi Jinping” (Presentation by Kenneth B. Dekleva, M.D., McKenzie Foundation Chair in Psychiatry I and Associate Professor, Peter J. O’Donnell Brain Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, given at the Headliners Club in Austin, TX, hosted by Geopolitical Futures and the China Public Policy Center, UT Austin LBJ School of Public Affairs, Oct. 9, 2018).

Dekleva_Xi-Jinping_2018-10-09
Dekleva_Xi-Jinping_2018

North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un

ISPP-2018_Kim-Jong-Un_poster
Click on image for larger view

View related presentation: “Go Tell It on the Mountain: The Psychology of North Korea’s Kim Jong Un” (Presentation by Kenneth B. Dekleva, M.D., McKenzie Foundation Chair in Psychiatry I and Associate Professor, Peter J. O’Donnell Brain Institute, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, given at the Headliners Club in Austin, TX, hosted by Geopolitical Futures and the China Public Policy Center, UT Austin LBJ School of Public Affairs, Oct. 9, 2018).

Dekleva_Kim-Jong-un_2018-10-09
Dekleva_Kim-Jong-un_2018


 

Brad Morrison (University of British Columbia), Christ'l De Landtsheer (University of Antwerp), Aubrey Immelman (St. John's University), Phyllis Johnson and Peter Suedfeld (University of British Columbia), ISPP, San Antonio, Texas, July 5, 2018.
Brad Morrison (University of British Columbia), Christ’l De Landtsheer (University of Antwerp), Aubrey Immelman (St. John’s University), Phyllis Johnson and Peter Suedfeld (University of British Columbia) at the 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Antonio, Texas, July 4-7, 2018.

 


Topical reports on this site

USPP-Website_header

The Personality Profile of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un (April 8, 2013)

Russia Threat Assessment: Psychological Profile of Vladimir Putin (March 27, 2014)

The Personality Profile of 2016 Republican Presidential Candidate Donald Trump (Aug. 9, 2015)

Research papers

The Political Personality of 2016 Republican Presidential Nominee Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, October 2016. (Paper presented at the 41st Annual Scientific Meeting of the International Society of Political Psychology, San Antonio, TX, July 4-7, 2018.) Abstract and link for full-text (31 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/103/

The Leadership Style of U.S. President Donald J. Trump. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (14 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/107/

The Political Personality of Russian Federation President Vladimir Putin. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, January 2017. Abstract and link for full-text (36 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/104/

The Personality Profile of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, April 2018. Abstract and link for full-text (32 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: https://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/119/

The Leadership Style of North Korean Supreme Leader Kim Jong Un. Working paper, Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, St. John’s University/College of St. Benedict, June 2018. Abstract and link for full-text (17 pages; PDF) download at Digital Commons: https://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/120/