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Archive for the 'Hillary Clinton' Category


Summary: The Presidential Electability Index (PEI) developed by Aubrey Immelman at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics predicted more than a year ahead of the 2016 presidential election that Donald Trump would win.



Summary: The Personal Electability Index (PEI), which has accurately predicted the outcome of every presidential election since 1996 (prior to Super Tuesday), is at variance with every conventional election-outcome forecasting model (on Election Day 2016). The Personal Electability Index projected in August 2015 that Donald Trump would win the Republican primary and go on to beat either Hillary Clinton or Bernie Sanders in the 2016 presidential election. As polls opened on November 8, 2016, conventional election-outcome forecasting models predicted a comfortable Clinton victory in the Electoral College.



Summary: The Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics has released political-psychological assessments of Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump, the Democratic and Republican candidates, respectively, in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.



Summary: Handicapping the first debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump in the 2016 U.S. presidential election cycle, employing the key presidential character traits identified by the American National Election Studies — competence, leadership, integrity, and empathy — and psychological profiles of Clinton and Trump, based on research conducted at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics.



Summary: Psychological advice on how Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump can exploit each other’s personality weaknesses to gain a winning edge in the presidential debates.



Summary: A psychological analysis of Hillary Rodham Clinton — Democratic nominee in the 2016 presidential election — by Rylee Pool and Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., at the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, revealed that Clinton’s predominant personality patterns are Ambitious/self-serving (a measure of narcissism) and Dominant/controlling, infused with secondary features of the Conscientious/dutiful and Retiring/reserved (aloof) patterns. In summary, Clinton’s personality composite can be characterized as an “adaptive elitist narcissist.” … October 2016 update: A follow-up study confirms Hillary Clinton’s predominant personality patterns are Ambitious/self-serving (a measure of narcissism) and Dominant/controlling, infused with secondary features of the Conscientious/dutiful and Retiring/reserved (introverted) patterns and some indication of Distrusting/suspicious features. This particular personality composite can be labeled “elitist narcissism” or, in political terms, “deliberative high-dominance introvert” — deliberative by virtue of substantial conscientiousness.



Summary: Aubrey Immelman, Ph.D., director of the Unit for the Study of Personality in Politics, projects the winner of the 2016 U.S. presidential election, employing the Personal Electability Index (PEI), which has accurately predicted the outcome of every presidential election since 1996 before Super Tuesday.



Summary: Psychological assessment of prospective Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Rodham Clinton. … On March 2, 2015, the New York Times reported that Hillary Clinton did not have a government email address while secretary of state and may have violated federal rules that officials’ correspondence be retained. … Compilation of research reports and related political analysis, conducted between 1999 and 2008, that may have a bearing on the matter in terms of Hillary Clinton’s personality traits, psychological motives, and leadership style. … … October 2016 update: Hillary Clinton’s predominant personality patterns are Ambitious / self-serving (a measure of narcissism) and Dominant / controlling, infused with secondary features of the Conscientious / dutiful and Retiring / reserved (introverted) patterns and some indication of Distrusting/suspicious features. This particular personality composite can be labeled elitist narcissism or, in political terms, deliberative high-dominance introvert — deliberative by virtue of substantial conscientiousness.