Current Events and the Psychology of Politics
Loading

Featured Posts        



categories        



Links        



archives        



meta        




Nov 7th, 2009


Today, I provide an overview of the investigation into the unsolved disappearance of St. John’s University (Minn.) student Josh Guimond.

On Monday, I will report on today’s Justice for Josh march.

All Possibilities Should Be Investigated in Guimond Case

Josh_lastfoto-1.jpg Joshua Guimond picture by Rifleman-Al
Last known photo of Josh Guimond

By Aubrey Immelman
The Record (CSB/SJU)
November 11, 2004

Tuesday [Nov. 9, 2004] marked the second anniversary of the disappearance of SJU [St. John’s University] student Joshua Guimond, and still there are no answers.

The St. Cloud Times reported on May 6, 2004 that Stearns County Sheriff John Sanner has said that the most likely explanation for Guimond’s disappearance “is that he wandered away from the party [i.e., the card game] and either fell into a lake or one of the swampy areas on campus.”

However, all three lakes on campus had been cleared by the Trident Foundation — the top search team in the nation — in May 2003.

After an exhaustive search, Scott Romme, executive director of the foundation, recommended that the search for Guimond head in another direction: “Efforts [by the Stearns County Sheriff's Department] coupled with our technologies and efforts should provide a very high degree of reassurance to the family and the community that Josh is most probably somewhere else” (Maple Lake Messenger, May 21, 2003).

Sanner responded that although the Trident Foundation did not find any trace of Guimond in the three lakes it investigated, the search did not rule out the possibility that Guimond was in one of the lakes.

“‘We felt more comfortable in looking at other possibilities after the Trident search,’ Sanner said. ‘But that’s not to say that Josh didn’t walk into a heavily swampy area and sink into the mud’” (Maple Lake Messenger, Nov. 5, 2003).

On May 6, 2004, the St. Cloud Times reported that about 10 members of the sheriff department’s Mounted Reserves had searched areas that had been too wet to cover in earlier searches.

They searched lowland areas near the university for about 3½ hours, but found nothing.

The sheriff then said that no more searches were planned, unless new information came to investigators.

In summary:

(1) The premier underwater search team in the United States has cleared any lakes that Guimond could plausibly have fallen into.

(2) After the Trident Foundation ruled out the lakes, law enforcement authorities (who are not underwater search experts) were reluctant to discount the possibility that Guimond was in one of the three lakes investigated, but held forth the possibility that Guimond may have walked into a heavily swampy area and sunk into the mud.

That speculation flies in the face of logic.

It seems implausible that Guimond could have wandered off into the darkness toward a swampy area.

To do so, he would not only have had to proceed in the opposite direction from his intended destination (his residence hall), but he would also have had to walk away from the broad, well-lit, paved pedestrian walkway that he had taken numerous times before to and from his destination.

(3) There is no factual or credible information that supports the speculation that Guimond may have walked into a swamp and sunk into the mud.

However, if authorities really believe this is a possibility, it is imperative they drain these low-lying areas and conduct a conclusive search to exclude this possibility.

(4) There is no evidence that Guimond vanished of his own accord.

He was without his car, glasses or a coat warm enough for the frigid mid-November weather.

None of his credit cards have been used and there has been no contact with any friends or family members in the two years since his disappearance.

To conclude, the St. Cloud Times Tuesday quoted Sanner as saying there is no evidence that Guimond was abducted or was the victim of any crime.

However, this does not eliminate the possibility that Guimond could have been abducted by a meticulous perpetrator who left no evidence of a crime.

In view of the circumstances, an abduction appears to be the most plausible explanation for Guimond’s disappearance.

A particularly compelling argument is that another young male, Jacob Wetterling, was abducted just a few miles away 13 years earlier and sexual predators are known to be highly territorial.

It would be foolish and irresponsible to discount two disappearances of young males in close proximity as an unfortunate coincidence.

———————————————————————————————————————————

Why Joshua Guimond’s disappearance should be investigated as a suspicious missing person case

By Aubrey Immelman
February 14, 2006

This analysis is a counterpoint to Richard Meryhew’s article “One last sip, one last step: A walk after a night of drinking has ended in disaster for a dozen young men at college” (Star Tribune, Feb. 12, 2006).

The article creates the erroneous impression that St. John’s University student Joshua Guimond was a drowning victim. In fact, the Guimond case is classified as a “missing person case and drowning has been effectively excluded as the cause of Guimond’s disappearance.

Following is a summary of facts and circumstances relevant to the case and my analysis of those facts and circumstances.

Joshua Guimond of Maple Lake disappeared around midnight on Saturday, November 9, 2002, while walking alone on the campus of St. John’s Abbey and University. (1)

More than four years have passed since the Trident Foundation — the nation’s top underwater search team — reported in May 2003, after an exhaustive search, that Guimond was not in any of the three lakes on campus as originally suspected.

On May 21, 2003, the Maple Lake Messenger reported that Trident executive director Scott Romme recommended the search for Guimond “head in another direction.” Efforts by the Stearns County Sheriff’s Department, “coupled with our technologies and efforts,” Romme wrote in his report, “should provide a very high degree of reassurance to the family and the community that Josh is most probably somewhere else.” (2)

Unfortunately, the intervening years have brought no answers and the investigation seems to have reached a dead end. Here’s a brief timeline:

Six months after the Trident Foundation had cleared the lakes at St. John’s, Stearns County Sheriff John Sanner told the Maple Lake Messenger (Nov. 5, 2003) that although the Trident Foundation did not find any trace of Guimond in any of the lakes on campus, the search did not rule out the possibility that Guimond was in one of the lakes: “We felt more comfortable in looking at other possibilities after the Trident search,” Sanner said. “But that’s not to say that Josh didn’t walk into a heavily swampy area and sink into the mud.” (3)

On May 6, 2004, a year after the definitive Trident search, the St. Cloud Times reported that about 10 members of the Stearns County Sheriff’s Department’s Mounted Reserves had searched areas that had been too wet to cover in earlier searches. They searched lowland areas near the university for about 3½ hours, but found nothing. The sheriff then said that no more searches were planned, unless new information came to investigators. (4)

In the most recent development, on October 27, 2005, the St. Joseph Newsleader reported that Josh Guimond’s father, Brian Guimond, had “contacted the Soil and Water Conservation Service, and an expert there wrote Guimond a letter stating there is no such thing as ‘quicksand’ in the wetlands on the campus where Guimond’s body could have sunk from sight.”(5)

————

Video: The Myth of Killer Quicksand (Discovery Channel, Feb. 11, 2011)

————

So, if Guimond is not in any lake or low-lying area on campus, where is he? Here are some relevant facts to consider in addressing that question:

  • The premier underwater search team in the United States has cleared all bodies of water that Guimond could plausibly have fallen into.
  • After the Trident Foundation ruled out the lakes, law enforcement authorities persisted with the notion that Guimond was in one of the lakes searched by Trident, though also holding forth the possibility that he may have walked into a heavily swampy area and sunk into the mud.
  • Given the findings of experts from the Trident Foundation and the Soil and Water Conservation Service, there is no factual or credible information that supports the speculation that Guimond may have walked into a swamp and sunk into the mud, as Stearns County’s Sheriff Sanner repeatedly asserted for nearly three years.
  • There is no physical or circumstantial evidence whatsoever that Guimond vanished of his own accord. He was without his car, glasses, or a coat warm enough for the freezing November weather. None of his credit cards have been used and there has been no contact with any friends or family members in the more than three years since his disappearance.
  • Sheriff Sanner maintained for at least two years that there was no evidence Guimond was abducted or the victim of any crime. (6) However, on October 27, 2005, the St. Joseph Newsleader quoted Sheriff Sanner as saying that the case is still classified as a “missing person investigation and that anything is possible, including an abduction.” (5)

In conclusion, all alternative explanations having been exhausted, it now seems plausible that the most likely explanation for Guimond’s disappearance is indeed an abduction. Could it be more than a coincidence that another young male, Jacob Wetterling, was abducted just a few miles away on October 22, 1989 in St. Joseph, 13 years before Guimond went missing, and that no trace of either Wetterling or Guimond has ever been found?

Sources cited and Web links

(1) Find Joshua Guimond

(2) “As Trident goes, TV crew comes to St. John’s” by Theresa Andrus. Maple Lake Messenger, May 21, 2003.

(3) “One year later, Joshua is gone but not forgotten” by Theresa Andrus. Maple Lake Messenger, November 5, 2003.

(4) “Mounted Reserves find nothing in search for missing SJU student” by Kelly Scott. St. Cloud Times, May 6, 2004.

(5) “Parents frustrated no developments in son’s vanishing” by Dennis Dalman. St. Joseph Newsleader, October 27, 2005.

(6) “Vigil signals hope for missing St. John’s student” by David Unze. St. Cloud Times, November 9, 2004.

——————————————————————

Joshua Guimond’s Final Journey

sju pic
Aerial photograph of St. John’s campus with same orientation as map below (see alternative link)

Based on interviews and ongoing private investigation, here’s a summary of Joshua Guimond’s last known movements and locations (as best I’ve been able to establish) the night he disappeared, along with a campus map and numbered legend to track Guimond’s route:


Map of St. John’s University, Collegeville, Minn. (PDF — larger image)

» Josh leaves card game at Metten Court (43) to return to his apartment in St. Maur House (15).

» Josh takes the paved pedestrian walkway (not shown on map) passing between the buildings of Seton Apartments (40); observed by one eyewitness standing behind dumpster at Seton Apartments.

» Josh crosses the intersection to the left of Stumpf Lake onto the main campus; observed by group of eyewitnesses crossing culvert in direction of bus stop on exit route to I-94.

» Josh walks in direction of his apartment in Maur House (15); no further witnesses.

» At this point, Josh had to cross County Road 159; a parking lot; and walk around the tennis courts to reach his apartment in Maur House (15); however, there is no electronic record that he used his computerized key card to enter his apartment.

Sidebar: Profile of Joshua Guimond’s Abductor

The offender responsible for Joshua Guimond’s disappearance, if foul play is involved, would have the following personal characteristics: above average intelligence; socially competent, with good interpersonal skills; employed in a skilled occupation; high birth-order status (e.g., first-born son); a poor relationship with his father, who humiliated him in childhood; a childhood history of inconsistent discipline; a reliable means of transportation, most likely a late-model car in good condition; and a precipitating situational stress in his personal life prior to the victim’s disappearance.

The offender would be considerably older than traditional-age college students. He would be very familiar with the college campus from which the victim disappeared; it would be part of his territory, his comfort zone. He likely would be familiar with the schedules of campus buses and security officers and would know whether the campus has surveillance cameras and where they are located.

The offender would have conducted extensive pre-surveillance of campus activity around midnight on weekends, which suggests he easily blends in and does not arouse the suspicions of students or security officers when out and about late at night on campus. He would be comfortable in outdoor locations.

The offender would be highly skilled in presenting the image of a loving and sincere individual and adept at charming others and gaining their confidence and trust. However, beneath this veneer of civility and trustworthiness, he would be selfish, cunning, manipulative, and driven by a need for power, domination, and control.

The offender would have chosen for himself an occupation or avocation that allows him to act as an authority figure and places him in a position where he can easily identify and gain the trust of vulnerable college-age men (e.g., youth counselor or coach); however, he will not have distinguished himself in his chosen occupation.

The offender may previously have come to the attention of authorities as a result of allegations of inappropriate relationships with younger men or minor violations such as trespassing, peeping, soliciting, or numerous driving offenses.

The offender would be a fussy, meticulous, impeccably groomed individual preoccupied with details, lists, organization, and schedules. He would act kindly toward those who submit to his authority but cold, critical, or vindictive toward those who do not. He would have few if any genuine, reciprocal, give-and-take friendships. He would be essentially a loner whose primary relationships are with younger men in a subservient, compliant role.

The offender likely would have rehearsed his abduction plan. This means that in the months prior to his victim’s disappearance, he used a con or ruse (e.g., asking for assistance or directions, feigning a fall, accident, or injury) to lure a student late at night into a vehicle, to an isolated area concealed from public view, or to an indoor location over which he had a great deal of control (e.g., a basement, garage, or office area).

The likely offender would have a longstanding interest in sexual bondage and discipline, and over the years may have sought out opportunities to discuss this and other sexual topics with younger men (possibly in a counseling situation, or perhaps in a joking or offhand fashion in more informal interactions). He would have an extensive collection of bondage pornography, though this would likely be a closely guarded secret.

After the victim’s disappearance, the offender would have closely followed the investigation in the news media; likely increased his alcohol consumption, showed signs of stress, and/or experienced weight loss; and may have changed jobs or left the area until the dust had settled enough for him to feel it was safe enough to return.

When he is finally apprehended, many will be shocked, asserting that this was the last person they would have suspected of being capable of such a heinous crime.

Sidebar: Suspect Sketch in Wetterling/Guimond Investigation

Below is a police sketch Fox 9 KMSP-TV in the Twin Cities used in a February 2004 feature about a college student working at the Tom Thumb convenience store in St. Joseph, who rented the video “Naked Gun” to Jacob Wetterling minutes before his abduction on October 22, 1989.

According to the Fox 9 report, this man came to the Tom Thumb store two weeks to the day after the abduction and talked obsessively about Jacob, saying, “They’ll never find that boy” (note the depersonalization of the victim in that statement).

The clerk thought this individual, described as a white male about 50 years of age (or about 70 in 2009) with receding gray hair, was behaving suspiciously. She reported him to the FBI and apparently the sketch was produced based on her eyewitness account.

This person closely matches the description of a suspicious person seen lurking around the Tom Thumb store and other area video rental places on the day of Jacob’s abduction.

It’s important to keep in mind that, unlike photographs, sketches based on eyewitness accounts are not exact likenesses. However, they typically capture enough of the basic characteristics of a suspect’s face to trigger a response from someone who knows the offender and thinks it might be the same person.

————————————————————————

Related case?


Photos of Daniel Acker released by police.

Disturbing details on alleged pool pervert

————————————————————————

What Happened to Joshua Guimond?

The following analysis by Julie Seifert, at the time a senior psychology major at the College of Saint Benedict in St. Joseph, Minn., was published as the Your Turn column “Guimond analysis maintains mystery” in the St. Cloud Times on November 20, 2007.

Nov. 9 [2007] may have seemed like an ordinary Friday night, but it held special meaning for me. It marked the fifth anniversary of the disappearance of Joshua Guimond from St. John’s University.

My interest in Josh’s case took root in the spring of my sophomore year when I became part of a criminal psychology study group on campus. Subsequently, I have taken it upon myself to examine what may have happened to Josh using the tools of criminal investigative analysis.

One of the investigative tools I’ve acquired in my study of criminal psychology is the “psychological autopsy” – a procedure used to establish the circumstances of a person’s death when the cause is uncertain.

Because there is no evidence that Josh is deceased, I am approaching my analysis of Josh’s disappearance as an “equivocal missing person analysis,” using the four elements of the psychological autopsy.

Voluntary disappearance

The first possibility to consider is natural causes. This could be either voluntary, such as when someone leaves on their own volition, or it can be due to an involuntary psychological condition, such as a dissociative fugue (a combination of amnesia and running away from one’s problems).

Looking first at the possibility that Josh may have left voluntarily, the truth of the matter is that it takes a great deal of planning and considerable sophistication to stage one’s own disappearance and for the fraud to remain undetected for five years.

There is no evidence on the hard drive of Josh’s computer that he researched a staged disappearance and there were no suspicious transactions on Josh’s bank or credit card accounts before or after his disappearance.

The temperature at the time of Josh’s disappearance was in the upper 30s, dropping during the night to the upper 20s, yet Josh was last seen wearing only a hooded sweatshirt, with no jacket or gloves.

He was without his glasses and his car had not been moved from where he had last parked it.

Taken together, these facts indicate that Josh was not prepared for any journey other than the short walk from Metten Court to his room in St. Maur House.

A mental breakdown

The most plausible involuntary “natural cause” condition would be the rare disorder known as dissociative fugue.

According to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, a fugue is diagnosed when an individual experiences a sudden disturbance in life that causes him or her to unexpectedly travel away from home, accompanied by confusion about personal identity and the assumption of a new identity.

However, my investigation revealed that Josh was a high-functioning, emotionally stable individual and found no evidence that Josh had experienced a sudden disruption in his life before his disappearance. In short, it seems highly unlikely that Josh would have developed such a condition, though it cannot be conclusively ruled out.

An accident

The next element of the equivocal analysis is the possibility of an accident.

Investigators – like most students, faculty, and people who followed the case in the media – assumed that Josh had fallen into one of the lakes on campus. But a drowning seemed increasingly implausible when no body was recovered after extensive searches and no body surfaced in the spring.

Finally, six months after Josh went missing, the Trident Foundation, said to be the top underwater search team in the nation, conducted a definitive search on campus and ruled out the possibility that Josh was in any lake on campus.

Suicide

Another element in a comprehensive analysis is suicide. For Josh to have taken his own life is the least likely of all the explanations for his disappearance. It is highly unusual for suicide victims to take measures that would prevent or delay the discovery of their remains. Moreover, there is no evidence that Josh was suicidal before his disappearance, nor did he have any history of attempted suicide or suicide threats.

Murder

The final element to examine in any missing person case is homicide. The common causes for homicide are personal, economic and sexual.

A personal cause in Josh’s case would be if he had an enemies or someone with a grudge against him. Drug or gambling debts might constitute an economic motive for murder. There is no evidence that personal or economic motives played any role in Josh’s disappearance.

A sex crime

Occasionally, murder has a sexual motive. This is a difficult motive to establish because it lives in the shadows of someone’s fantasies, where it cannot be observed, except indirectly through reports of sexual misconduct involving other victims.

As we enter the sixth year of this unsolved mystery, we can all do our part to keep Josh’s memory alive by not forgetting what took place in our community the night of Nov. 9, 2002 – thus keeping alive the hope that one day well know the truth about what happened to Josh on that fateful night.

———————————

7/8/2015 Update

New blog on Guimond case by Jennifer Brown

——————————————————

Related reports on this site

Joshua Guimond Missing — 10th Anniversary (Nov. 10, 2012)

Penn State Scandal Highlights Guimond Mystery (Nov. 10, 2011)

Minnesota Missing Person Linkage Analysis (June 22, 2011)


Refer Joshua Guimond Case to FBI (Nov. 10, 2010)

Josh Guimond: New Developments (May 24, 2010)

Fighting to Protect Our Children (April 14, 2010)

Jacob Wetterling Freedom Walk (Dec. 21, 2009)


On Sunday, Dec. 19, 2009, the third and final day of Jacob’s Freedom Walk for Missing and Abducted Children, Vietnam vets, led by Mike Clark and Jerry Wetterling, are met by Jacob’s mother Patty Wetterling upon arriving at the site where 11-year-old Jacob was abducted on Sunday, October 22, 1989, about half a mile from the Wetterling home in rural St. Joseph, Minn. After a prayer, three rifle rounds are fired as the universal symbol of letting the lost or missing know they’re being searched for.

Guimond: “Justice for Josh” March (Nov. 9, 2009)


On Saturday, Nov. 7, 2009, three days before the 7th anniversary of the disappearance of St. John’s University student Joshua Guimond, Josh’s family and supporters convened near the site of Josh’s disappearance for a “Justice for Josh” march to raise public awareness of their son’s plight, after which they delivered a petition for renewed efforts in the search to the Stearns County Sheriff’s Dept. On Saturday evening, the family held a prayer service and candlelight vigil at Josh’s church in Maple Lake.

Jacob Wetterling 20 Years On (Oct. 22, 2009)


A photo of Jacob Wetterling from 1989, the year he was taken (left), and an age-adjusted image of what he may have looked like at age 29 (right).

Jacob Wetterling Celebration (Oct. 16, 2009)


Patty Wetterling sings with Red Grammer during the “Celebration of Children” concert at the College of St. Benedict, St. Joseph, Oct. 17, 2009. (Photo credit: Adam Hammer / St. Cloud Times)

Jaycee Lee Dugard Found Alive (Aug. 28, 2009)

Wetterling Friend Shares Story (April 28, 2009)

U.S. Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Aaron Larson poses with his fiancée Jackie Tentinger and 2-year-old son, Anikan, as he arrives home April 17, 2009 in Slayton, Minn. (Photo credit: Associated Press / St. Cloud Times)
U.S. Army Reserve Staff Sgt. Aaron Larson poses with his fiancée Jackie Tentinger and 2-year-old son, Anikan, as he arrives home April 17, 2009 in Slayton, Minn., after a year-long deployment in Iraq. As an 11-year-old boy in St. Joseph, Aaron was with his best friend Jacob Wetterling when Jacob was kidnapped by a masked gunman on Sunday, Oct. 22, 1989. (Photo credit: Justine Wettschreck – Daily Globe / Associated Press)

Jacob Wetterling Lead Unravels (Jan. 7, 2009)


Vernon Seitz’s Bay View home
(Photo: John Klein / Journal Sentinal)

Ottis Toole Murdered Adam Walsh (Dec. 16, 2008)

——————————————————————————————————————

FROM THE ARCHIVES: One Year Ago — November 7, 2008

Rebuilding the Republican Party

One year ago today, I reported that Lincoln Chafee, a former Republican senator from Rhode Island who endorsed Barack Obama for president, predicted a bloody struggle for the soul of the GOP.

Be Sociable, Share!




39 Responses to “Missing Person Joshua Guimond”
  1. Tweets that mention Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Missing Person Joshua Guimond -- Topsy.com Says:

    [...] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Cliff Torrence: Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Missing Person Joshua Guimond http://bit.ly/4t6bop [...]

  2. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jaycee Lee Dugard Found Alive Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  3. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling Celebration Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  4. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Wetterling Friend Shares Story Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  5. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Josh Guimond: New Developments Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  6. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Fighting to Protect Our Children Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  7. All Around the World News Says:

    Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Missing Person Joshua Guimond…

    I found your entry interesting … I’ve added a Trackback to it on my weblog …

  8. Jacob Wetterling - Ardub Says:

    [...] 11-year-old Jacob Wetterling was abducted in 1989 [...]

  9. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling Freedom Walk Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  10. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Guimond: “Justice for Josh” March Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  11. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling 20 Years On Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  12. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling: Rassier Search Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  13. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling Lead Unravels Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009)  [...]

  14. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Wetterling Suspect Dan Rassier Says:

    [...] Jacob Wetterling isn’t the only young male to have gone missing from the area. On Nov. 9-10, 2002, St. John’s University student Joshua Guimond vanished without a trace from the college campus, approximately 6 miles distant from the Wetterling abduction site. [...]

  15. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Unsolved Murder of Chris Jenkins Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  16. FindJoshua.com » Blog Archive » All Possibilities Should Be Investigated in Guimond Case Says:

    [...] View Original Article [...]

  17. FindJoshua.com » Blog Archive » Why Joshua Guimond’s disappearance should be investigated as a suspicious missing person case Says:

    [...] View Original Article [...]

  18. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling — Latest News Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  19. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob’s Kidnapping ‘Comes of Age’ Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  20. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Quo Vadis, Tea Party? Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond [...]

  21. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Refer Joshua Guimond Case to FBI Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  22. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Ottis Toole Murdered Adam Walsh Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  23. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Missing Person Brandon Swanson Says:

    [...] Immelman, A. (2004, November 9). All possibilities should be investigated in Guimond case. The Record. Retrieved December 13, 2010, from http://www.immelman.us/news/missing-person-joshua-guimond. [...]

  24. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Missing Person Kevin Jay Ayotte Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  25. Why Joshua Guimond’s disappearance should be investigated as a suspicious missing person case | the dark rituals of the smiley face killers Blog Says:

    [...] View original article: http://www.immelman.us/news/missing-person-joshua-guimond/ [...]

  26. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling Kidnapping Anniversary Marked By AMBER Alert Donation Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  27. Immelman for Congress » Blog Archive » Penn State Scandal Highlights Joshua Guimond Mystery Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond [...]

  28. Immelman vs. Bachmann » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling Kidnapping Tips Says:

    [...] What happened to Josh Guimond? [...]

  29. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » Missing Person Joshua Guimond — Tenth Anniversary Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  30. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » Missing in Minnesota: 147 Unsolved Missing Person Cases Says:

    […] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) […]

  31. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling Case featured on CNN’s ‘Hunt With John Walsh’ Says:

    [...] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) [...]

  32. Aubrey Immelman Says:

    “Benedictine Abbey in Minnesota: 2 Missing Persons and About 230 Victims …”

    Despite about 230 victims of sexual misconduct, not including predation upon vulnerable adults and college students, and two missing persons in the vicinity of St. John’s Abbey in Collegeville, there have been absolutely no arrests and no convictions. The Sheriff’s Department has been overtly hostile to one of the victim’s relatives, and no wonder, the Sheriff is a St. John’s Abbey alumnus. …

    http://eponymousflower.blogspot.com/2014/11/benedictine-abbey-in-minnesota-2.html

  33. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » New Book on Jacob Wetterling Abduction, Search, and Suspects Says:

    […] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) […]

  34. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » 25-Year Anniversary of Jacob Wetterling Abduction Says:

    […] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) […]

  35. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » Daniel Heinrich Search Warrant in Jacob Wetterling Kidnapping Says:

    […] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) […]

  36. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » Danny Heinrich Arrested: Wetterling Press Conference Says:

    […] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) […]

  37. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling’s Remains Found in Central Minnesota Says:

    […] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) […]

  38. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » Jacob Wetterling Memorial Service — Video Live Stream Says:

    […] Missing Person Joshua Guimond (Nov. 7, 2009) […]

  39. The Immelman Turn » Blog Archive » “In the Dark” Podcast — How Law Enforcement Mishandled the Jacob Wetterling Investigation Says:

    [...] Joshua Guimond, a 20-year-old student at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minn., vanished without a trace in 2002. Brian Guimond, Josh’s father, says the Stearns County Sheriff’s Office has never fully investigated the case [...]

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.