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The expert witness best qualified to comment on the accuracy and reliability of Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s memory of a sexual assault approximately 36 years ago is Dr. Elizabeth Loftus, distinguished professor in the Department of Psychology and Social Behavior and the Department of Criminology, Law, and Society at the University of California, Irvine, with additional appointments in the university’s Department of Cognitive Sciences and the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory.

Elizabeth-Loftus

“The real question in this case … is not whether this happened so much. But who actually did it. Because everything I’ve seen in the discussions of this case, one of the things I want to know is when did she attach the name Brett Kavanaugh to the episode that she is recounting from when she was 15 years old. And I wish somebody would ask that question because I think the answer to that question is pretty crucial.”

– Elizabeth Loftus (“Anderson Cooper 360°,” CNN, September 19, 2018)

Eminent California professor and human memory expert weighs in on Christine Ford’s allegations against Kavanaugh (Scott Morefield, Townhall.com, Sept. 23, 2018)

Caution, the Kavanaugh mess may never be resolved satisfactorily (Megan McArdle, Washington Post, Sept. 17, 2018)

Kavanaugh’s accuser may be telling the truth, but there are still big problems with her story (John Ziegler, Mediaite, Sept. 17, 2018)

More » Google search: Christine Blasey Ford Kavanaugh Elizabeth Loftus


Related interest

Recovered Memory of Childhood Sexual Abuse. Collegeville and St. Joseph, MN: St. John’s University and the College of St. Benedict. (Originally published in St. Cloud Unabridged, Sept. 1994, pp. 2-4.) Retrieved from Digital Commons website: http://digitalcommons.csbsju.edu/psychology_pubs/114/

Abstract: Examines the psychological basis for repression and recovery of traumatic memories, presents the results of research on potential sources of error in delayed or recovered memories, and offers possible reasons (primarily related to clinical practice and collective behavior) for false accusations of sexual abuse.

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